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Examining the Governor’s and House Budgets by State Agency

April 30, 2019 Data Viz

Both Governor Sununu and the New Hampshire House of Representatives have produced recommended budgets for the State. To help build those budgets, State agencies made funding requests to provide services. Comparisons between the State agency requests, the Governor’s recommendation, and the budget passed by the House provide insights into the changes made to the State Budget proposals during the process.

State agencies are required to submit budget requests every State Budget cycle, listing the activities they identified as core to their work as well as needs or requests unfunded or underfunded in past State Budgets. State agencies produce “Efficiency Budget” requests and identify “Additional Prioritized Needs,” which together comprise the Total Agency Request. (To learn more about this process and what the terms “efficiency budget” and “additional prioritized needs” mean in detail, see NHFPI’s resource Building the Budget and an explainer Common Cents post from November 2016, “New Process Will Guide Formation of Next State Budget.”)

The Governor constructed a budget proposal informed by the Efficiency Budget and the Total Agency Request, proposing one set of spending levels for each agency. The House subsequently altered those appropriations in some instances. (To learn more about the Governor’s recommendations, see NHFPI’s Issue Brief The Governor’s Budget Proposal, State Fiscal Years 2020-2021. To learn more about the House version of the State Budget, see NHFPI’s Issue Brief The House State Budget for State Fiscal Years 2020 and 2021.)

Explore the interactive Data Viz below to understand the Total Agency Requests and the proposed appropriations from the Governor and the House relative to the Efficiency Budget requests. For more context relative to these requests, see other recent NHFPI Data Viz posts:

 

 

For more on the State Budget process, see NHFPI’s NH State Budget web page and Building the Budget resource.

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New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

tree with coins

It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.