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Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends

February 9, 2017 State Budget

Building the New Hampshire State Budget is a long process, beginning when the State government is not even halfway through the duration of the previous State Budget and usually ending in that previous budget’s final days, approximately a year later. The process includes five major phases, challenging jargon, unwritten norms, multiple revenue estimates, and several different versions of expenditure plans and revenue expectations. But understanding the State Budget is more than just learning the process; it is key to understanding our priorities and values as a State. The State Budget reflects the discussions and debates in our communities and provides the most comprehensive set of public investment choices New Hampshire makes.

This document provides a guide to the process of building the State Budget, its organizational structure, and the terminology used. It also summaries the aggregate results of the State Budget process by examining recent trends in funding allocated to broad policy areas, certain large agencies, and local governments.

 

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Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends (PDF)

 

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Common Cents Blog

New Data Show Food Insecurity Levels Declining Prior to the COVID-19 Crisis

10 Sep 2020

tree with coins

According to data released on September 9 by the United States Department of Agriculture, food insecurity levels in New Hampshire continued to decline during 2019, prior to the onset of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. The report outlines the trends of reduced food insecurity in the nation and in New Hampshire, declining from the higher levels resulting from the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009. The overall improvements to the state economy through 2019, along with the effectiveness of key nutritional aid programs, did contribute to lower levels of food insecurity, although the benefits of the economic recovery did not reach all Granite Staters in an equal or timely manner. Although food insecurity levels declined through the years preceding 2020, the current crisis facing Granite Staters is not reflected in these 2019 data. The recent economic pressures on many individuals and families with lower incomes in New Hampshire have been severe, and current levels of food insecurity are very likely to be substantially higher.