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Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends

February 9, 2017 State Budget

Building the New Hampshire State Budget is a long process, beginning when the State government is not even halfway through the duration of the previous State Budget and usually ending in that previous budget’s final days, approximately a year later. The process includes five major phases, challenging jargon, unwritten norms, multiple revenue estimates, and several different versions of expenditure plans and revenue expectations. But understanding the State Budget is more than just learning the process; it is key to understanding our priorities and values as a State. The State Budget reflects the discussions and debates in our communities and provides the most comprehensive set of public investment choices New Hampshire makes.

This document provides a guide to the process of building the State Budget, its organizational structure, and the terminology used. It also summaries the aggregate results of the State Budget process by examining recent trends in funding allocated to broad policy areas, certain large agencies, and local governments.

 

Download the full report:

Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends (PDF)

 

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New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage Falls Further Behind

6 Jan 2020

tree with coins

The federal minimum wage is the lowest hourly wage that can be paid to most workers anywhere in the nation. Since its inception at the national level in 1938, when only certain workers were covered, the wage has increased and encompassed more types of employees over time. State law sets New Hampshire’s minimum wage to the federal minimum level, currently at $7.25 per hour. An individual working 40 hours per week at this wage will make about $15,000 per year, assuming they work all 52 weeks. This income level is below the federal poverty guidelines for all households other than a single person, and well below the levels for households that include a partner and children.