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State Budget

NH flagIt is often said that a budget is a statement of priorities, a reflection of the choices that the people – through their elected representatives – make about the amount of public resources they wish to devote to meeting shared goals and the relative importance they assign to each of those goals.

NHFPI aims to illustrate recent budget trends, highlight future challenges, and examine the ways in which the New Hampshire budget is used to educate the state’s children, ensure access to health care, promote public safety, maintain public structures, and achieve other critical public priorities.

 

State Budget FY 2018-2019

Visit our NH State Budget page for all NHFPI publications, blog posts, presentations, and other content relating to the current state budget process.  The page is also accessible via the Resources tab on the main menu.

 

Latest State Budget Publications

  • The State Budget for Fiscal Years 2020 and 2021 December 20, 2019
    The New Hampshire State Budget funds important services for Granite State families and children, supporting the infrastructure, education and health services, and public amenities that residents use daily. After an extended process, New Hampshire policymakers finalized a State Budget that increases investments in key areas, including public education and health services. The State Budget for ...
  • Preliminary Analysis of the State Budget Agreement September 26, 2019
    New Hampshire’s new State Budget boosts funding for local public education, with a substantial increase during the budget biennium and a smaller increase continued over time, and includes upward adjustments to Medicaid reimbursement rates, one-time aid to cities and towns, and support for affordable housing. The budget funds these initiatives in part by deploying current ...
  • The Senate State Budget for State Fiscal Years 2020 and 2021 June 14, 2019
    The Senate voted to pass its version of the State Budget on June 6, modifying the version provided by the House and proposing major new initiatives in health and social services. Incorporating several bills passed independently by the Senate, the Senate Budget would expand home- and community-based services for children, establish a new job training ...
  • Education Funding in the House Budget May 6, 2019
    The House version of the State Budget would significantly enhance funding for local education in New Hampshire. The proposal would deploy an additional $165.3 million to local public education over the biennium, directing additional ongoing aid primarily to communities with relatively low property values per student and high percentages of students eligible for free and ...
  • The House State Budget for State Fiscal Years 2020 and 2021 April 25, 2019
    The New Hampshire House of Representatives voted to pass its version of the State Budget on April 11, proposing to shift significant resources to education and health services during the next two fiscal years. The House budget would enhance State support for local public education, public higher education, services for those with developmental disabilities and ...

 

View all State Budget publications

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Common Cents Blog

New Data Show Food Insecurity Levels Declining Prior to the COVID-19 Crisis

10 Sep 2020

tree with coins

According to data released on September 9 by the United States Department of Agriculture, food insecurity levels in New Hampshire continued to decline during 2019, prior to the onset of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. The report outlines the trends of reduced food insecurity in the nation and in New Hampshire, declining from the higher levels resulting from the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009. The overall improvements to the state economy through 2019, along with the effectiveness of key nutritional aid programs, did contribute to lower levels of food insecurity, although the benefits of the economic recovery did not reach all Granite Staters in an equal or timely manner. Although food insecurity levels declined through the years preceding 2020, the current crisis facing Granite Staters is not reflected in these 2019 data. The recent economic pressures on many individuals and families with lower incomes in New Hampshire have been severe, and current levels of food insecurity are very likely to be substantially higher.