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Testimony on HB1 and the Proposed Closure of NH Healthy Kids

March 11, 2011 Health Policy, State Budget
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On Thursday, March 10, NHFPI Policy Analyst Deborah Fournier appeared before the House Finance Committee to highlight concerns related to the Governor’s proposal to close the New Hampshire Healthy Kids Corporation and to convert its enrollees into Medicaid enrollees.

“It is unclear whether Medicaid, with no managed care contract and no additional staff, will be able to hold a lower per member per month cost constant in the absence of other utilization and care coordination controls,” Fournier said.

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Governor Lynch’s FY 2012-2013 Budget Proposal

March 1, 2011 State Budget
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On February 15, Governor John Lynch presented his proposed budget for the fiscal year 2012-2013 biennium to the Legislature. Overall, he recommends that the state spend a total of $4.7 billion from General and Education Funds over the next two years, a decline of more than 3 percent relative to anticipated expenditures from these funds, and from federal fiscal relief monies, during the current FY 2010-2011 biennium.

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House Ways & Means Revenue Estimates Show Virtually No Growth For FY 2012-2013

February 3, 2011 State Budget, State Tax Policy
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The House Way and Means Committee predicts that total General and Education Fund revenue will grow very little, if at all, over the next 30 months. As a result, the Committee’s estimates serve to underscore the role that declining revenues have played in creating New Hampshire’s fiscal difficulties. If the Committee’s estimates come to pass, total General and Education Fund revenue in FY 2013 will reach its lowest level, in inflation-adjusted dollars, since the advent of the Education Fund more than a decade ago.

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State Delays Implementation of Medicaid Work Requirements, Citing Potential Coverage Losses

11 Jul 2019

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Earlier this week, New Hampshire state officials suspended the implementation of the work and community engagement requirements for expanded Medicaid beneficiaries until September 30. The Department of Health and Human Services had no information on the compliance of approximately 17,000 individuals, which would have meant up to that many individuals would have lost their health coverage starting in early August if they did not provide information and fulfill their required hours by the end of July. With this suspension, coverage losses due to noncompliance with the work requirements would not take place until early December, barring any other intervening policy changes from the state or federal governments or the pending results of legal action.