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The Senate’s FY 2012-2013 Budget Proposal

June 6, 2011 State Budget
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For the most part, the Senate followed the path laid by the House in its version of the budget, imposing substantial spending reductions across a wide array of vital public services. In broad terms, the budget supported by the Senate would lower General and Education Fund expenditures roughly $240 million or approximately 5 percent. Like the House, the Senate would cut payments for uncompensated care, reduce local aid and curtail support for higher education.

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Medicaid: A Key Source of Insurance in New Hampshire

April 20, 2011 Health Policy, State Budget

Medicaid serves about one in 10 people in N.H. A look at the families and individuals it serves, its funding structure and the potential consequences of significant reductions to the program.

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House Finance Committee’s FY 2012-2013 Budget Proposal

March 29, 2011 State Budget
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Under the Committee’s recommendations, the state would spend approximately $4.4 billion from its General and Education Funds over the course of the FY 2012-2013 biennium, close to $300 million below Governor Lynch’s proposed budget for the same period and approximately 10 percent less than the $4.9 billion the state expects to spend from those funds and in federal stimulus monies by the close of the current FY 2010-2011 biennium. Accordingly, the Committee’s recommendations, if enacted, would entail either the outright elimination of, or exceptionally sharp reductions to, a wide range of vital public services and programs.

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Declining Business Tax and Other Revenues Suggest Caution for State Budget

15 Aug 2019

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As policymakers continue to consider State Budget options and choices during the ongoing continuing resolution, understanding State revenue trends remains critical to determining the State’s ability to pay for needed services and the policy choices that affect available resources. With State Fiscal Year 2019 completed and SFY 2020 underway, recent months of revenue collections have provided some additional insight into whether the State might expect more revenue in future years. Questions remain about the future of business tax receipts in particular, which have been very difficult to predict due to recent abnormal behavior following the federal tax overhaul; however, recent data suggest anticipated declines in receipts may limit revenue going forward.