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The Senate’s Proposed FY 2014-2015 Budget

June 13, 2013 State Budget

In the aggregate, the levels of spending approved by the House of Representatives and the Senate via their respective versions of the FY 2014-15 budget are relatively similar. The lower chamber would appropriate $4.55 billion in General and Education Funds over the next two years; the upper body would provide $4.59 billion. Of course, while the House and Senate may arrive at destinations that are fairly close to one another, the paths they follow to get there are quite different. Here’s a closer look at the Senate’s plan.

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House Finance Committee’s Proposed FY 2014-2015 Budget

April 2, 2013 State Budget
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Like the plan offered by Gov. Hassan earlier this year, the FY 2014-2015 budget the House of Representatives will consider this week begins to undo some of the damage wrought by several years of spending cuts. The principal difference between the two budgets centers around casino gambling. In total, the House would spend $187 million or 4.2 percent more than what New Hampshire is expected to spend in the current biennium, but it is approximately $54 million lower than the General and Education Fund appropriations recommended by the Governor and does not include $80 million in potential licensing fees from gambling.

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Governor Hassan’s Proposed FY 2014-2015 Budget

March 14, 2013 State Budget

In submitting her proposed fiscal year 2014-2015 budget to the Legislature in February, Governor Maggie Hassan described it as one that “begins rebuilding” from the steep cuts in spending adopted during previous budget debates. The description is apt, for while the Governor’s budget would significantly improve funding for some critical priorities, such as higher education and mental health services, it falls short in restoring support to other areas central to the quality of life in New Hampshire and to economic security for its residents, such as aid to cities and towns or safety net programs.

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State’s Diverse Tax Base Stabilizes Revenue, But Business Tax Changes May Increase Volatility

29 Jun 2017

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New Hampshire’s state tax revenue is relatively stable, but the State’s largest tax may be among the most volatile types of common taxes, a new analysis from The Pew Charitable Trusts suggests. Between 1997 and 2016, New Hampshire’s tax volatility, as measured through percentage changes from the prior fiscal year, was only higher than five other states, suggesting New Hampshire’s tax revenues do not typically deviate dramatically from year to year relative to other states. However, digging into the diverse revenue streams and drawing on the experiences from other states shows some risk for New Hampshire.