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NHFPI Statement on House Finance Committee Vote to Support Reauthorization of the Health Protection Program

March 3, 2016 News

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 3, 2016

 

NHFPI Statement on House Finance Committee Vote to Support Reauthorization of the Health Protection Program

 

Concord, NH – Earlier today, the New Hampshire House of Representatives Finance Committee, by a bipartisan 18-8 margin, approved HB 1696, which would reauthorize the New Hampshire Health Protection Program through December 2018. New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute Executive Director Jeff McLynch issued the following statement:

“The Health Protection Program today serves nearly 48,000 of our fellow citizens, ensuring they have access to affordable private-sector health insurance while bringing hundreds of millions of federal tax dollars back into the New Hampshire economy.

“Many of the Granite Staters who take part in the Health Protection Program work in jobs that are low-paid, but that help keep the New Hampshire economy moving. They provide care to children and the elderly, build roads and bridges, and staff restaurants and hotels in communities across the state.

“Today’s vote by the House Finance Committee represents another positive step toward reauthorizing the program for two more years and continuing a successful, unique, and bipartisan approach to promoting health security and fostering economic growth.”

 

The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to exploring, developing, and promoting public policies that foster economic opportunity and prosperity for all New Hampshire residents, with an emphasis on low- and moderate-income families and individuals. Learn more at www.nhfpi.org.

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