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NHFPI Announces 2018 Summer Intern Julia Vieira of UNH Carsey School of Public Policy

June 21, 2018 News

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 21, 2018

 

NHFPI Announces 2018 Summer Intern Julia Vieira
of UNH Carsey School of Public Policy

 

The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute (NHFPI) announces the organization’s 2018 summer internship program will host Julia Hayes Vieira of Newmarket, New Hampshire.

Julia is currently enrolled in the University of New Hampshire – Carsey School of Public Policy, Master of Public Policy program, where she recently concluded the Carsey School’s 2017-2018 Fellowship focused on fiscal and economic policy research.

The NHFPI 2018 summer internship will examine a range of New Hampshire fiscal and economic policy topics, including trends in the state’s rural and urban areas.

A native of Brazil, Julia obtained an undergraduate degree in Political Science from the University of Brasilia. Julia holds dual citizenship in the United States and Brazil, and currently resides in Newmarket, New Hampshire.

The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to exploring, developing, and promoting public policies that foster economic opportunity and prosperity for all New Hampshire residents, with an emphasis on low- and moderate-income families and individuals. Learn more at www.nhfpi.org.

 

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Common Cents Blog

New Data Show Food Insecurity Levels Declining Prior to the COVID-19 Crisis

10 Sep 2020

tree with coins

According to data released on September 9 by the United States Department of Agriculture, food insecurity levels in New Hampshire continued to decline during 2019, prior to the onset of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. The report outlines the trends of reduced food insecurity in the nation and in New Hampshire, declining from the higher levels resulting from the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009. The overall improvements to the state economy through 2019, along with the effectiveness of key nutritional aid programs, did contribute to lower levels of food insecurity, although the benefits of the economic recovery did not reach all Granite Staters in an equal or timely manner. Although food insecurity levels declined through the years preceding 2020, the current crisis facing Granite Staters is not reflected in these 2019 data. The recent economic pressures on many individuals and families with lower incomes in New Hampshire have been severe, and current levels of food insecurity are very likely to be substantially higher.