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Bruce King Joins NHFPI Board of Directors

July 6, 2017 News

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 6, 2017

Bruce King Joins NHFPI Board of Directors

 

Bruce King photoCONCORD, NH – The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute announces the election of Bruce King of Etna to the organization’s Board of Directors. Bruce King is president and CEO of New London Hospital and has more than 30 years’ experience working in the field of health care finance and administration in New Hampshire.

“Bruce brings extensive knowledge of the current challenges facing rural hospitals across the state and the positive impact expanded access to health care has had on New Hampshire residents and communities,” said John Shea, executive director of the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute (NHFPI).

Since 2003, Bruce King has served as president and CEO of New London Hospital, a 25 bed critical access hospital, providing primary care, emergency, and specialized clinical services as well as ambulance service to 15 towns.

“As heath care providers, we see first-hand the difference access to health care makes for children, families, and individuals of all ages, particularly for elderly residents and others who struggle to afford basic needs,” said Bruce King. “I look forward to working with NHFPI to deepen public understanding of critical health needs in our communities today and to foster important public policy conversations around how to ensure New Hampshire’s health care system is strong, stable, and accessible to all.”

“Access to health care is a key component to economic security, enabling individuals to maintain their employment and provide for their families,” added John Shea. “The health care sector is a significant contributor to our state’s economy, and proposals to reduce federal funding and access to health care threaten not only the well-being of New Hampshire residents, but also the stability and viability of our state’s health care providers.”

Bruce King has worked in the health care administration and finance field since 1977. He joined the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (DHMC) in 1987, as vice president for fiscal services from 1987 to 1994 and as vice president for contracting and network development from 1994 to 2003; he currently serves as president and CEO of New London Hospital through a management contract with DHMC. He is a member of the faculty of the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College.

Bruce King currently serves as vice-chair of the Crotched Mountain Foundation and as trustee and treasurer of the State of New Hampshire Health Plan. He is a member and former chair of the Rural Health Coalition and has served on the boards of the Foundation for Healthy Communities, the New Hampshire Hospital Association, and numerous other community and health-related organizations.

The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to exploring, developing, and promoting public policies that foster economic opportunity and prosperity for all New Hampshire residents, with an emphasis on low- and moderate-income families and individuals. Learn more at www.nhfpi.org.

 

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CONTACT:
AnnMarie French
603.856.8337, ext. 2

 

 

 

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