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House Ways & Means Revenue Estimates Show Virtually No Growth For FY 2012-2013

February 3, 2011 State Budget, State Tax Policy
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The House Way and Means Committee predicts that total General and Education Fund revenue will grow very little, if at all, over the next 30 months. As a result, the Committee’s estimates serve to underscore the role that declining revenues have played in creating New Hampshire’s fiscal difficulties. If the Committee’s estimates come to pass, total General and Education Fund revenue in FY 2013 will reach its lowest level, in inflation-adjusted dollars, since the advent of the Education Fund more than a decade ago.

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An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System

December 17, 2010 State Tax Policy
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A look at some of the trends in tax collections over the past decade with a brief description of each of the state’s eight major sources of tax revenue — highlighting some of the characteristics that can help guide policymakers in devising a response to the fiscal challenges now before New Hampshire.

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New Hampshire Taxes Remain Comparatively Low, Slow Growing

August 26, 2010 State Tax Policy
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New Hampshire has long been portrayed as a low tax state, due in large measure to the absence of broad-based sales and income taxes. Census Bureau data released last month generally affirm that portrayal, revealing that, relative to the size of its economy, New Hampshire has nearly the lowest level of combined state and local taxes in the nation.

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Committee of Conference Keeps Medicaid Reimbursement Rate Increases, Boosts Fiscal Disparity Aid in Final Budget Agreement

24 Jun 2019

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Negotiators from the House and Senate agreed to a final budget proposal in the Committee of Conference for House Bill 1 and House Bill 2 last week, preserving many Senate proposals while incorporating additional education aid and removing the paid family and medical leave proposal supported by both the House and the Senate in their respective versions of the State Budget. The Committee of Conference budget proposal does not include the expansion of the Interest and Dividends Tax to include capital gains as proposed by the House, but freezes business tax rates at 2018 levels. The proposal retains the Senate’s $17.5 million appropriation for a new secure psychiatric facility and $40 million in revenue sharing to municipal governments during the biennium.