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Testimony on CACR 6 and Supermajority Requirements for Tax Increases

May 11, 2011 State Tax Policy
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NHFPI Executive Director Jeff McLynch testified on May 11 before the Senate Internal Affairs Committee on a proposal to amend the state’s constitution to require a three-fifths supermajority vote of in the House and Senate to pass any tax or fee increase.

“In brief, CACR 6 would undermine sound fiscal policy. It would unduly constrain the flexibility New Hampshire needs to respond to changing economic circumstances and would likely lead to a great reliance upon temporary solutions to future budget shortfalls, more frequent legislative stalemates and higher borrowing costs,” he said.

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Business Taxes in New Hampshire: Where Do They Stand? How Much Do They Matter?

April 25, 2011 State Tax Policy

Some of the current proposals to reduce business taxes ignore facts about N.H.’s tax structure and, more generally, about the impact taxes have on economic activity. Here’s an overview to help put things in perspective.

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House Ways & Means Revenue Estimates Show Virtually No Growth For FY 2012-2013

February 3, 2011 State Budget, State Tax Policy
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The House Way and Means Committee predicts that total General and Education Fund revenue will grow very little, if at all, over the next 30 months. As a result, the Committee’s estimates serve to underscore the role that declining revenues have played in creating New Hampshire’s fiscal difficulties. If the Committee’s estimates come to pass, total General and Education Fund revenue in FY 2013 will reach its lowest level, in inflation-adjusted dollars, since the advent of the Education Fund more than a decade ago.

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New Data Show Food Insecurity Levels Declining Prior to the COVID-19 Crisis

10 Sep 2020

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According to data released on September 9 by the United States Department of Agriculture, food insecurity levels in New Hampshire continued to decline during 2019, prior to the onset of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. The report outlines the trends of reduced food insecurity in the nation and in New Hampshire, declining from the higher levels resulting from the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009. The overall improvements to the state economy through 2019, along with the effectiveness of key nutritional aid programs, did contribute to lower levels of food insecurity, although the benefits of the economic recovery did not reach all Granite Staters in an equal or timely manner. Although food insecurity levels declined through the years preceding 2020, the current crisis facing Granite Staters is not reflected in these 2019 data. The recent economic pressures on many individuals and families with lower incomes in New Hampshire have been severe, and current levels of food insecurity are very likely to be substantially higher.