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Testimony Regarding Constitutional Amendment CACR13

April 11, 2012 State Tax Policy
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A proposed constitutional amendment to prohibit any new tax on a person’s income all but guarantees lengthy court battles over state tax policy, according to NHFPI Executive Director Jeff McLynch, who testified against CACR 13 before the Senate Internal Affairs Committee on Wednesday, April 4.

McLynch also presented an analysis written by University of New Hampshire law professor Marcus Hurn, who is author of several scholarly articles on the N.H. Constitution and its taxing authority. According to Hurn, incorporating CACR 13 into the constitution “would start a cascade of constitutional questions that could take years to settle.”

McLynch’s testimony and a link to Hurn’s analysis follow:

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Constitutional Limits on Taxes or Spending Would Increase Pressure on Local Property Taxes

March 20, 2012 Research, State Tax Policy
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Local governments across New Hampshire have received less aid from the state to meet the needs of local citizens and businesses in recent years. As a result, they have been forced to increase local property taxes to preserve the education, public safety, transportation, and other services that make New Hampshire’s communities desirable places to live, work, and visit. Competing versions of a constitutional amendment now before the Legislature risk adding to these pressures when New Hampshire already relies on local property taxes more than any other state.

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Proposed Spending Cap Could Lock In Current Spending Cuts for a Decade

February 13, 2012 State Tax Policy

A proposal to rewrite the New Hampshire Constitution to cap the growth of state spending at the rate of inflation would create a new set of problems when it comes to developing a smart budget.

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Report Shows Higher Effective Tax Rates for Residents with Low Incomes

18 Oct 2018

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Most New Hampshire residents with lower incomes pay a higher percentage of the money they earn in state and local taxes than residents with higher incomes do. In a new report released yesterday, the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy conducted evaluations of state and local government tax systems in each of the 50 states and modeled their impacts on non-elderly residents. The report concludes that 45 states have tax systems that ask a greater percentage of the incomes of those with low earnings than those with the highest incomes.