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Testimony Regarding BET and Tipped Wages

May 14, 2013 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

I am here today to voice opposition to Amendment 2013-1668s, which seeks to reduce the taxes owed by businesses that employ wait staff and other workers that receive some of their pay in the form of tips. As proposed, the amendment would make the struggle to finance public services vital to New Hampshire’s economic health that much more difficult. Furthermore, the amendment may establish a double standard in the treatment of tips under law. Finally, the amendment would undermine the basic purpose of the BET, eating away at its base and compromising the stability it brings to New Hampshire’s tax system. Consequently, I urge the Committee to reject the amendment.

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Exempting Internet Access from Taxation Would Increase Fiscal Stress

April 25, 2012 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

A proposal before lawmakers to exempt Internet access from New Hampshire’s Communications Services Tax could reduce state revenue by as much as $12 million annually.

Like the tobacco tax cut, this reduction was never accounted for in the state budget. As NHFPI’s latest Issue Brief explains, the proposal would therefore add to the fiscal stress New Hampshire faces now and in the future. More to the point, it could force policymakers to make further cuts to areas such as higher education and health care.

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Testimony Regarding Constitutional Amendment CACR13

April 11, 2012 State Tax Policy
NH flag

A proposed constitutional amendment to prohibit any new tax on a person’s income all but guarantees lengthy court battles over state tax policy, according to NHFPI Executive Director Jeff McLynch, who testified against CACR 13 before the Senate Internal Affairs Committee on Wednesday, April 4.

McLynch also presented an analysis written by University of New Hampshire law professor Marcus Hurn, who is author of several scholarly articles on the N.H. Constitution and its taxing authority. According to Hurn, incorporating CACR 13 into the constitution “would start a cascade of constitutional questions that could take years to settle.”

McLynch’s testimony and a link to Hurn’s analysis follow:

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New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage Falls Further Behind

6 Jan 2020

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The federal minimum wage is the lowest hourly wage that can be paid to most workers anywhere in the nation. Since its inception at the national level in 1938, when only certain workers were covered, the wage has increased and encompassed more types of employees over time. State law sets New Hampshire’s minimum wage to the federal minimum level, currently at $7.25 per hour. An individual working 40 hours per week at this wage will make about $15,000 per year, assuming they work all 52 weeks. This income level is below the federal poverty guidelines for all households other than a single person, and well below the levels for households that include a partner and children.