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Constitutional Limits on Taxes or Spending Would Increase Pressure on Local Property Taxes

March 20, 2012 Research, State Tax Policy
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Local governments across New Hampshire have received less aid from the state to meet the needs of local citizens and businesses in recent years. As a result, they have been forced to increase local property taxes to preserve the education, public safety, transportation, and other services that make New Hampshire’s communities desirable places to live, work, and visit. Competing versions of a constitutional amendment now before the Legislature risk adding to these pressures when New Hampshire already relies on local property taxes more than any other state.

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Proposed Spending Cap Could Lock In Current Spending Cuts for a Decade

February 13, 2012 State Tax Policy

A proposal to rewrite the New Hampshire Constitution to cap the growth of state spending at the rate of inflation would create a new set of problems when it comes to developing a smart budget.

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Testimony before the Commission to Study Business Taxes

February 6, 2012 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

The legislative Commission to Study Business Taxes met Monday, February 6, to receive public input on its draft report recommending changes to New Hampshire’s tax system. Taken together, the recommendations would mean a substantial revenue loss for the state. Had the recommendations been in place for the current biennium, they would have reduced state revenue by a conservative estimate of $100 million. This kind of revenue loss would likely require major cuts to public services, including infrastructure and education that are critical to attracting new businesses. NHFPI Executive Director Jeff McLynch testified that the proposals may hurt economic growth, not help.

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Elections Highlight Continuing Questions About Keno Revenue

8 Nov 2017

tree with coins

While results are still preliminary, Keno gaming appears to have been legalized in seven cities around New Hampshire as a result of Tuesday’s votes. The margin of victory in Rochester for Keno legalization was reportedly only one vote and may still be subject to change or recount, but voters appear to have legalized Keno gaming in Berlin, Claremont, Laconia, Manchester, Nashua, Rochester, and Somersworth. Voters in Concord, Dover, and Keene voted against Keno gaming legalization. Franklin had legalized Keno gaming previously, and the Portsmouth City Council decided to not put Keno on the ballot. Other municipalities, including the City of Lebanon, may make decisions regarding Keno legalization next year. These results have implications for State policy and finances.