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Supermajority Requirement to Increase Taxes at Odds With Sound Fiscal Policy

January 29, 2015 State Tax Policy

The New Hampshire House of Representatives will soon consider a measure, CACR 1, to amend the state’s constitution to require that an increase in any existing tax or license fee or the creation of a new tax or license fee be approved by three-fifths of both chambers of the legislature. In each of the past two legislatures, the House rejected attempts to amend New Hampshire’s constitution in this way. Those decisions were well founded, for such constraints not only are at odds with sound fiscal policy, but also erode New Hampshire’s democratic institutions.

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NHFPI Testimony Regarding Senate Bills to Reduce NH Business Taxes

January 20, 2015 State Tax Policy
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On Tuesday, January 20, NHFPI Executive Director Jeff McLynch testified before the New Hampshire Senate Ways and Means Committee to express concerns about both SB 1, reducing the business profits tax (BPT) rate, and SB 2, reducing the business enterprise tax (BET) rate. SB 1, taken in combination with its companion measure, SB 2, would ultimately and permanently reduce state revenue by $78 million on a biennial basis. Given the fiscal challenges now before New Hampshire, tax cuts of this magnitude would endanger the public services on which residents and business rely and curtail the sorts of investments critical to a brighter economic future for all.

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New Hampshire’s Tax System Asks Far Less of the Wealthy than of the Poor

January 14, 2015 State Tax Policy
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More than five years after the end of the Great Recession, many Granite Staters are still struggling. The typical household’s income has yet to recover the ground it lost during the economic downturn, while wages for individuals and families at the bottom of the income distribution are still where they were two decades ago. In fact, a new report shows that, on average, the wealthiest families in New Hampshire pay an effective state and local tax rate that is less than one-third of the rate faced by families just trying to make ends meet.

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Elections Highlight Continuing Questions About Keno Revenue

8 Nov 2017

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While results are still preliminary, Keno gaming appears to have been legalized in seven cities around New Hampshire as a result of Tuesday’s votes. The margin of victory in Rochester for Keno legalization was reportedly only one vote and may still be subject to change or recount, but voters appear to have legalized Keno gaming in Berlin, Claremont, Laconia, Manchester, Nashua, Rochester, and Somersworth. Voters in Concord, Dover, and Keene voted against Keno gaming legalization. Franklin had legalized Keno gaming previously, and the Portsmouth City Council decided to not put Keno on the ballot. Other municipalities, including the City of Lebanon, may make decisions regarding Keno legalization next year. These results have implications for State policy and finances.