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Business Tax Rate Reductions Add to Uncertain Revenue Picture

January 16, 2018 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

At the start of the 2018 Legislative Session, several bills were filed that would likely reduce New Hampshire’s available revenue. When considering changes to revenues, policymakers should be cognizant of the revenue shortfall risks the State presently faces. As of December, revenues are meeting the monthly plan based on estimates set forth by the Legislature to pay for State Budget expenditures. However, the revenue surplus is significantly smaller than it was at the start of the last two legislative sessions.

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Revenue in Review: An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System and Major Revenue Sources

May 24, 2017 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

New Hampshire’s revenue system is relatively unique in the United States, as it lacks broad-based income and sales taxes and instead relies on a diversity of more narrowly-based taxes, fees, and other revenue sources to fund public services. This system presents both advantages and disadvantages to stable, adequate, and sustainable revenue generation.

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New Hampshire’s Revenue Problem Persists; Business Tax Rate Reductions Would Impede Full Recovery

July 27, 2015 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

New Hampshire’s ongoing budget debate hinges, in part, on current and future revenues, yet collections continue to fall short of pre-recession levels and appear unlikely to recover fully in the immediate future. Preliminary data from the Department of Administrative Services suggest that, while General and Education Fund revenue is poised to exceed initial expectations for fiscal year 2015, it will likely remain some $250 million less in FY 2015 than it was in FY 2008, after taking inflation into account. Furthermore, proposed reductions in the rates of the business profits and business enterprise taxes would help to perpetuate this revenue problem.

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New Data Show Food Insecurity Levels Declining Prior to the COVID-19 Crisis

10 Sep 2020

tree with coins

According to data released on September 9 by the United States Department of Agriculture, food insecurity levels in New Hampshire continued to decline during 2019, prior to the onset of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. The report outlines the trends of reduced food insecurity in the nation and in New Hampshire, declining from the higher levels resulting from the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009. The overall improvements to the state economy through 2019, along with the effectiveness of key nutritional aid programs, did contribute to lower levels of food insecurity, although the benefits of the economic recovery did not reach all Granite Staters in an equal or timely manner. Although food insecurity levels declined through the years preceding 2020, the current crisis facing Granite Staters is not reflected in these 2019 data. The recent economic pressures on many individuals and families with lower incomes in New Hampshire have been severe, and current levels of food insecurity are very likely to be substantially higher.