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Board of Directors

Board of Directors and Officers as of January 1, 2019

 

Ryan Audley

Chair

President and CEO, R.S. Audley, Inc.

Bow, NH

 

Margaret Walsh

Vice Chair

Professor of Sociology, Keene State College

Keene, NH

 

Bruce P. King

Treasurer

President and CEO, New London Hospital

New London, NH

 

Victoria Adewumi

Secretary

Community Liaison, Manchester Health Department

Manchester, NH

 

George Bald

Former Commissioner, New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development

Somersworth, NH

 

Roland Lamy

Principal, Helms & Company

Concord, NH

 

Patrick Miller

Principal, Helms & Company

Concord, NH

 

Jo Porter

Director, Institute for Health Policy and Practice – University of New Hampshire

Durham, NH

 

Peter W. Powell

President, Powell Real Estate

Lancaster, NH

 

Jonathan Routhier

Executive Director, Community Support Network Inc.

Concord, NH

 

Kristine Stoddard, Esq.

Director of New Hampshire Public Policy, Bi-State Primary Care Association

Bow, NH

 

 

 

 

Organizations and affiliations are listed for identification purposes only.

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Common Cents Blog

New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

tree with coins

It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.