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About

Mission

Founded in 2009, the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute (NHFPI) is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to exploring, developing, and promoting public policies that foster economic opportunity and prosperity for all New Hampshire residents, with an emphasis on low- and moderate-income families and individuals. Based in Concord, NHFPI produces regular reports on the fiscal and economic challenges facing New Hampshire and strives to serve as a resource to anyone interested in meeting those challenges in a fair and sound fashion.

Affiliations

In its efforts to promote equitable, responsible, and sustainable fiscal and economic policies, NHFPI collaborates with two national networks of state-level policy research organizations, the State Priorities Partnership (SPP) and the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN).  To learn more about SPP and EARN, simply click on the logos below.

State Priorities Partnership logo with tagline, Analysis and Impact

Economic Analysis and Research Network

Funding

NHFPI’s work is made possible by the generous support of foundations, organizations, and individuals that share its vision of economic opportunity, prosperity, and security for all New Hampshire residents.  Among its current foundation supporters are the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Endowment for Health,  New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, and New Hampshire Children’s Health Foundation.

If you find NHFPI’s work valuable, please consider adding your name to the organization’s growing list of supporters.  You may make a tax-deductible contribution today, either by visiting our Donations page or mail your contribution to: New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute, 64 North Main Street, Concord, NH 03301.

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

tree with coins

It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.