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About

Mission

Founded in 2009, the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute (NHFPI) is an independent nonprofit organization dedicated to exploring, developing, and promoting public policies that foster economic opportunity and prosperity for all New Hampshire residents, with an emphasis on low- and moderate-income families and individuals. Based in Concord, NHFPI produces regular reports on the fiscal and economic challenges facing New Hampshire and strives to serve as a resource to anyone interested in meeting those challenges in a fair and sound fashion.

Affiliations

In its efforts to promote equitable, responsible, and sustainable fiscal and economic policies, NHFPI collaborates with two national networks of state-level policy research organizations, the State Priorities Partnership (SPP) and the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN).  To learn more about SPP and EARN, simply click on the logos below.

State Priorities Partnership logo with tagline, Analysis and Impact

Economic Analysis and Research Network

Funding

NHFPI’s work is made possible by the generous support of foundations, organizations, and individuals that share its vision of economic opportunity, prosperity, and security for all New Hampshire residents.  Among its current foundation supporters are the Annie E. Casey Foundation, Endowment for Health,  New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, and New Hampshire Children’s Health Foundation.

If you find NHFPI’s work valuable, please consider adding your name to the organization’s growing list of supporters.  You may make a tax-deductible contribution today, either by visiting our Donations page or mail your contribution to: New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute, 64 North Main Street, Concord, NH 03301.

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

State Delays Implementation of Medicaid Work Requirements, Citing Potential Coverage Losses

11 Jul 2019

tree with coins

Earlier this week, New Hampshire state officials suspended the implementation of the work and community engagement requirements for expanded Medicaid beneficiaries until September 30. The Department of Health and Human Services had no information on the compliance of approximately 17,000 individuals, which would have meant up to that many individuals would have lost their health coverage starting in early August if they did not provide information and fulfill their required hours by the end of July. With this suspension, coverage losses due to noncompliance with the work requirements would not take place until early December, barring any other intervening policy changes from the state or federal governments or the pending results of legal action.