Revenue in Review: An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System and Major Revenue Sources

New Hampshire’s revenue system is relatively unique in the United States, as it lacks broad-based income and sales taxes and instead relies on a diversity of more narrowly-based taxes, fees, and other revenue sources to fund public services. This system presents both advantages and disadvantages to stable, adequate, and sustainable revenue generation.

Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends

Building the New Hampshire State Budget is a long process, which includes five major phases, challenging jargon, unwritten norms, multiple revenue estimates, and several different versions of expenditure plans and revenue expectations. But understanding the State Budget is more than just learning the process; it is key to understanding our priorities and values as a State.

Making Ends Meet

New Hampshire’s economy has, for the most part, recovered from the Great Recession, yet far too many working families still struggle to make ends meet.

Data Viz

These posts feature interactive data and insights to improve public understanding of fiscal and economic trends important to New Hampshire.  

Recent Publications:

New Hampshire’s Numbers: 2016 Census Bureau Estimates for Income, Poverty, Housing Costs, and Health Insurance Coverage

September 28, 2017 State Economy
house and family image

The United States Census Bureau American Community Survey data released September 2017 provides estimates, based on data collected in surveys conducted throughout 2016, of New Hampshire’s population characteristics. The survey data provide year-to-year comparisons of key indicators affecting the lives of Granite Staters. This Fact Sheet outlines Census Bureau estimates for income, poverty, housing costs, and health insurance coverage data for New Hampshire.

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Measuring the Size of New Hampshire’s State Budget

September 11, 2017 State Budget
ruler and pages photo

Legislative deliberations during the creation of New Hampshire’s biennial State Budget often evaluate the size of budget proposals relative to the prior biennial operating budget. Debates frequently focus on the overall growth of the budget, but measurements of different subsets of the budget or comparisons relative to different baselines can create confusion and misunderstandings. Budget growth discussions during the 2017 Legislative Session included estimates ranging from 1.4 percent in the first year and 1.1 percent in the second year to a total increase of 10.5 percent. Numbers used in public debates and widely reported in the press characterizing the size of the final budget ranged from $11.7 billion to more than $12 billion.

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The State Budget for Fiscal Years 2018 and 2019

July 13, 2017 State Budget
New Hampshire State House

New Hampshire’s State Budget provides the basis through which most State activities are funded for the next two years. While the overall growth in this budget is slightly less than the growth of its predecessor, revenues projected to be available enabled the Governor and the Legislature to fund certain state-level priorities. This State Budget emphasizes care for children and youths, including through child protection, mental health care, substance use disorder treatment, and juvenile justice changes, relative to certain other priorities. Substantial tax cuts for businesses were enacted, with the potential for future revenue declines that are not likely to be fully offset by other revenue increases.

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Common Cents Blog

Lackluster September State Revenues Reduce Surplus

4 Oct 2017

tree with coins

September was the first big month for revenue collection of State fiscal year (SFY) 2018, and while the total cash collected should not yet ring alarm bells, overall receipts were nothing to boast about. This trend continues observations from SFY 2017, which ended June 30, 2017, and the first two months of the current fiscal year. The General and Education Trust Funds, the primary repositories for the least restricted revenue streams from State taxation, were $2.3 million (0.5 percent) above plan for the year after September’s receipts, but that was down from $4.6 million at the end of August, with September’s shortfall relative to the revenue plan cutting the unrestricted cash revenue surplus in half.

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