Revenue in Review: An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System and Major Revenue Sources

New Hampshire’s revenue system is relatively unique in the United States, as it lacks broad-based income and sales taxes and instead relies on a diversity of more narrowly-based taxes, fees, and other revenue sources to fund public services. This system presents both advantages and disadvantages to stable, adequate, and sustainable revenue generation.

Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends

Building the New Hampshire State Budget is a long process, which includes five major phases, challenging jargon, unwritten norms, multiple revenue estimates, and several different versions of expenditure plans and revenue expectations. But understanding the State Budget is more than just learning the process; it is key to understanding our priorities and values as a State.

Making Ends Meet

New Hampshire’s economy has, for the most part, recovered from the Great Recession, yet far too many working families still struggle to make ends meet.

Data Viz

These posts feature interactive data and insights to improve public understanding of fiscal and economic trends important to New Hampshire.  

Recent Publications:

The Senate State Budget for State Fiscal Years 2020 and 2021

June 14, 2019 State Budget

The Senate voted to pass its version of the State Budget on June 6, modifying the version provided by the House and proposing major new initiatives in health and social services. Incorporating several bills passed independently by the Senate, the Senate Budget would expand home- and community-based services for children, establish a new job training program, and invest in a secure psychiatric unit facility and other mental health facility infrastructure. The Senate also voted to increase Medicaid reimbursement rates for all providers with a $60 million appropriation, which would help ensure the provision of health services to residents with limited resources and assist in bolstering the health care workforce.

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Funding the State Budget: Recent Trends in Business Taxes and Other Revenue Sources

May 22, 2019 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

Understanding recent revenue trends is key to accurately projecting the amount of revenue expected over the next two State fiscal years and maintaining a balanced State Budget. Revenue projections are especially difficult to make accurately this year, given recent abnormal behavior in receipts from the State’s two primary business taxes, which have driven most revenue growth in recent years. These unusual trends have produced a significant revenue surplus, which presents an opportunity for making critical investments. However, understanding both the potential causal factors for the increases in business tax receipts and the trends in other revenue sources informs decisions concerning those investments and the fiscal support needed for them in the future.

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Medicaid Work Requirements and Coverage Losses

May 20, 2019 Health Policy
stethoscope and pen with medical charts

New Hampshire’s expanded Medicaid program provides health coverage to approximately 50,000 Granite Staters with low incomes. The program is a partnership between the state and federal government that brings hundreds of millions of dollars in federal revenue into the state economy annually, and is key for access to health services for people with substance use disorders or mental health conditions. In the most recent reauthorization of the expanded Medicaid program, it was reformed into the New Hampshire Granite Advantage Health Care Program, and work and community engagement requirements were added for enrollees.

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Common Cents Blog

Committee of Conference Keeps Medicaid Reimbursement Rate Increases, Boosts Fiscal Disparity Aid in Final Budget Agreement

24 Jun 2019

tree with coins

Negotiators from the House and Senate agreed to a final budget proposal in the Committee of Conference for House Bill 1 and House Bill 2 last week, preserving many Senate proposals while incorporating additional education aid and removing the paid family and medical leave proposal supported by both the House and the Senate in their respective versions of the State Budget. The Committee of Conference budget proposal does not include the expansion of the Interest and Dividends Tax to include capital gains as proposed by the House, but freezes business tax rates at 2018 levels. The proposal retains the Senate’s $17.5 million appropriation for a new secure psychiatric facility and $40 million in revenue sharing to municipal governments during the biennium.

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