Revenue in Review: An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System and Major Revenue Sources

New Hampshire’s revenue system is relatively unique in the United States, as it lacks broad-based income and sales taxes and instead relies on a diversity of more narrowly-based taxes, fees, and other revenue sources to fund public services. This system presents both advantages and disadvantages to stable, adequate, and sustainable revenue generation.

Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends

Building the New Hampshire State Budget is a long process, which includes five major phases, challenging jargon, unwritten norms, multiple revenue estimates, and several different versions of expenditure plans and revenue expectations. But understanding the State Budget is more than just learning the process; it is key to understanding our priorities and values as a State.

Making Ends Meet

New Hampshire’s economy has, for the most part, recovered from the Great Recession, yet far too many working families still struggle to make ends meet.

Data Viz

These posts feature interactive data and insights to improve public understanding of fiscal and economic trends important to New Hampshire.  

Recent Publications:

Census Bureau 2018 Estimates for Income, Poverty, Housing Costs, and Health Coverage

October 9, 2019 State Economy
house and family image

The U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey data released September 26, 2019 provide estimates of population characteristics based on data collected in surveys conducted throughout 2018. The survey data provide year-to-year comparisons of key indicators affecting the lives of Granite Staters, including data concerning household income, poverty, rental housing costs, and health coverage. Income and poverty levels remained essentially unchanged from last year. Rental housing costs continued to be high relative to incomes, and household income inequality increased.

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The Potential Impacts of Proposed SNAP Eligibility and Work Requirement Changes on Food Insecurity

October 9, 2019 Health Policy
vegetables

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program enhances the ability of individuals and families with low incomes to purchase healthy and nutritious food. This federal program benefits nearly 40 million people nationwide. Over two-thirds of participants are families with low incomes. The remaining beneficiaries include individuals with low incomes, those with temporary or permanent disabilities, and older adults on fixed-incomes. About one in eight children across New Hampshire benefit from SNAP, and 73,959 individuals were enrolled as of August 2019. Proposed changes to the eligibility criteria are projected to result in an estimated 3,500 New Hampshire households losing benefits, including up to 18 percent of all New Hampshire SNAP-enrolled households with children.

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Preliminary Analysis of the State Budget Agreement

September 26, 2019 State Budget
New Hampshire State House

New Hampshire’s new State Budget boosts funding for local public education, with a substantial increase during the budget biennium and a smaller increase continued over time, and includes upward adjustments to Medicaid reimbursement rates, one-time aid to cities and towns, and support for affordable housing. The budget funds these initiatives in part by deploying current surplus revenues, including revenues from reduced spending and increased lapse during the continuing resolution. Funding stems in part from freezing business tax rates at 2019 levels. However, future business tax rates would be contingent on a revenue-based trigger and could move up or down for Tax Year 2021 depending on the strength of receipts during the first year of the budget biennium.

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Common Cents Blog

New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

tree with coins

It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.

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