Revenue in Review: An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System and Major Revenue Sources

New Hampshire’s revenue system is relatively unique in the United States, as it lacks broad-based income and sales taxes and instead relies on a diversity of more narrowly-based taxes, fees, and other revenue sources to fund public services. This system presents both advantages and disadvantages to stable, adequate, and sustainable revenue generation.

Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends

Building the New Hampshire State Budget is a long process, which includes five major phases, challenging jargon, unwritten norms, multiple revenue estimates, and several different versions of expenditure plans and revenue expectations. But understanding the State Budget is more than just learning the process; it is key to understanding our priorities and values as a State.

Making Ends Meet

New Hampshire’s economy has, for the most part, recovered from the Great Recession, yet far too many working families still struggle to make ends meet.

Data Viz

These posts feature interactive data and insights to improve public understanding of fiscal and economic trends important to New Hampshire.  

Recent Publications:

Medicaid Expansion in New Hampshire and the State Senate’s Proposed Changes

March 30, 2018 Health Policy
stethoscope and pen with medical charts

New Hampshire’s Medicaid expansion is an important program with impacts on the state’s public health and economy. Medicaid expansion provides health coverage to approximately 52,000 low-income people in New Hampshire, and more than 90 percent of program expenses have been funded by the federal government since the program began in 2014. Since that time, hundreds of millions of federal dollars have helped provide medical care for Granite Staters and contributed to the state economy, both through payments to medical providers and helping ensure a healthy, productive workforce, and assisting the state’s efforts to combat the ongoing opioid crisis.

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Business Tax Rate Reductions Add to Uncertain Revenue Picture

January 16, 2018 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

At the start of the 2018 Legislative Session, several bills were filed that would likely reduce New Hampshire’s available revenue. When considering changes to revenues, policymakers should be cognizant of the revenue shortfall risks the State presently faces. As of December, revenues are meeting the monthly plan based on estimates set forth by the Legislature to pay for State Budget expenditures. However, the revenue surplus is significantly smaller than it was at the start of the last two legislative sessions.

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New Hampshire’s Numbers: 2016 Census Bureau County Estimates Show Disparities Within the State

October 19, 2017 State Economy
house and family image

Following the primary data release in September 2017, the United States Census Bureau American Community Survey data released in October 2017 provides estimates, based on data collected in surveys conducted throughout 2016, of New Hampshire’s population characteristics for all geographic subdivisions with more than 20,000 residents. These data permit comparisons between point estimates for median household income and poverty rates in each of the state’s ten counties and 13 largest municipalities. On a county level, Granite Staters see widely different median household incomes from statewide median of $70,936, based on data collected in 2016, but also from each other.

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Common Cents Blog

Legislature Considers Mini-Budget, Many Other Spending Bills as Session Ends

14 May 2018

tree with coins

Following a flurry of amendments to existing bills, the Legislature now faces major spending decisions in a non-budget year that would make use of the current unrestricted revenue surplus. Bills to authorize new State expenditures totaling approximately $130.4 million, which is in addition to the current State operating budget, propose major changes, including a new agreement with hospitals over reimbursements, education and transportation infrastructure funding, State employee salary increases, and reductions in state revenue. The Legislature is convening a Committee of Conference on the largest bill on May 15, and plans to wrap up all its business by May 24.

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