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Medicaid: A Key Source of Insurance in New Hampshire

April 20, 2011 Health Policy, State Budget

Medicaid serves about one in 10 people in N.H. A look at the families and individuals it serves, its funding structure and the potential consequences of significant reductions to the program.

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House Finance Committee’s FY 2012-2013 Budget Proposal

March 29, 2011 State Budget
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Under the Committee’s recommendations, the state would spend approximately $4.4 billion from its General and Education Funds over the course of the FY 2012-2013 biennium, close to $300 million below Governor Lynch’s proposed budget for the same period and approximately 10 percent less than the $4.9 billion the state expects to spend from those funds and in federal stimulus monies by the close of the current FY 2010-2011 biennium. Accordingly, the Committee’s recommendations, if enacted, would entail either the outright elimination of, or exceptionally sharp reductions to, a wide range of vital public services and programs.

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Testimony on HB1 and the Proposed Closure of NH Healthy Kids

March 11, 2011 Health Policy, State Budget
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On Thursday, March 10, NHFPI Policy Analyst Deborah Fournier appeared before the House Finance Committee to highlight concerns related to the Governor’s proposal to close the New Hampshire Healthy Kids Corporation and to convert its enrollees into Medicaid enrollees.

“It is unclear whether Medicaid, with no managed care contract and no additional staff, will be able to hold a lower per member per month cost constant in the absence of other utilization and care coordination controls,” Fournier said.

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New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage Falls Further Behind

6 Jan 2020

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The federal minimum wage is the lowest hourly wage that can be paid to most workers anywhere in the nation. Since its inception at the national level in 1938, when only certain workers were covered, the wage has increased and encompassed more types of employees over time. State law sets New Hampshire’s minimum wage to the federal minimum level, currently at $7.25 per hour. An individual working 40 hours per week at this wage will make about $15,000 per year, assuming they work all 52 weeks. This income level is below the federal poverty guidelines for all households other than a single person, and well below the levels for households that include a partner and children.