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Medicaid: A Key Source of Insurance in New Hampshire

April 20, 2011 Health Policy, State Budget

Medicaid serves about one in 10 people in N.H. A look at the families and individuals it serves, its funding structure and the potential consequences of significant reductions to the program.

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House Finance Committee’s FY 2012-2013 Budget Proposal

March 29, 2011 State Budget
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Under the Committee’s recommendations, the state would spend approximately $4.4 billion from its General and Education Funds over the course of the FY 2012-2013 biennium, close to $300 million below Governor Lynch’s proposed budget for the same period and approximately 10 percent less than the $4.9 billion the state expects to spend from those funds and in federal stimulus monies by the close of the current FY 2010-2011 biennium. Accordingly, the Committee’s recommendations, if enacted, would entail either the outright elimination of, or exceptionally sharp reductions to, a wide range of vital public services and programs.

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Testimony on HB1 and the Proposed Closure of NH Healthy Kids

March 11, 2011 Health Policy, State Budget
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On Thursday, March 10, NHFPI Policy Analyst Deborah Fournier appeared before the House Finance Committee to highlight concerns related to the Governor’s proposal to close the New Hampshire Healthy Kids Corporation and to convert its enrollees into Medicaid enrollees.

“It is unclear whether Medicaid, with no managed care contract and no additional staff, will be able to hold a lower per member per month cost constant in the absence of other utilization and care coordination controls,” Fournier said.

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Common Cents Blog

Unsettled Business Tax Revenues Push Surplus Upward, Offer Limited Insight for the Future

7 Dec 2018

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The fortunes of State revenues continue to rise and fall with New Hampshire’s two primary business taxes, which provided positive signs for near-term revenue but have not shown these levels are sustainable. While the two business taxes remained healthy, other revenue sources were relatively flat overall, leaving the State with a revenue surplus entirely dependent on the two business taxes. The lack of growth in other revenue sources combined with the uncertainty around business taxes creates an environment in which it will be very difficult to accurately project revenues for the new State Budget biennium.