Home » Currently Reading:

State Tax

NH state quartersTo some, taxes are a means to an end, representing the bills that are due for services ranging from the judicial system to environmental protections, or, in Oliver Wendell Holmes’ formulation, “the price we pay for a civilized society.”  To others, taxes are a policy end unto themselves, as they offer policymakers another tool to try to employ in efforts to enhance economic security or to promote economic development.

NHFPI seeks to improve public understanding of New Hampshire’s tax system, its role in financing state expenditures, the impact it has on families and individuals at different income levels, and the influence it may or may not have upon personal and business decisions.

 

Latest State Tax Publications

  • Early Impacts of the COVID-19 Crisis on State Revenues September 9, 2020
    Funding for New Hampshire’s State Budget relies on revenues generated from economic activity, which has been severely curtailed by the COVID-19 crisis. These State revenues pay for key services for Granite Staters, including supports and assistance designed to help those facing financial hardship. With nearly half of New Hampshire households reporting a loss in employment ...
  • Business Tax Revenue and the State Budget September 10, 2019
    The State Budget represents New Hampshire’s funding priorities for public investment in education, health care, public safety, housing, conservation and preservation, roads and bridges, and a range of services to Granite State residents and businesses. To support these investments, policymakers must determine methods for raising revenue and project the amount of revenue available over the ...
  • Funding the State Budget: Recent Trends in Business Taxes and Other Revenue Sources May 22, 2019
    Understanding recent revenue trends is key to accurately projecting the amount of revenue expected over the next two State fiscal years and maintaining a balanced State Budget. Revenue projections are especially difficult to make accurately this year, given recent abnormal behavior in receipts from the State’s two primary business taxes, which have driven most revenue ...
  • Business Tax Rate Reductions Add to Uncertain Revenue Picture January 16, 2018
    At the start of the 2018 Legislative Session, several bills were filed that would likely reduce New Hampshire’s available revenue. When considering changes to revenues, policymakers should be cognizant of the revenue shortfall risks the State presently faces. As of December, revenues are meeting the monthly plan based on estimates set forth by the Legislature ...
  • Revenue in Review: An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System and Major Revenue Sources May 24, 2017
    New Hampshire’s revenue system is relatively unique in the United States, as it lacks broad-based income and sales taxes and instead relies on a diversity of more narrowly-based taxes, fees, and other revenue sources to fund public services. This system presents both advantages and disadvantages to stable, adequate, and sustainable revenue generation.

 

View all State Tax publications

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

New Data Show Food Insecurity Levels Declining Prior to the COVID-19 Crisis

10 Sep 2020

tree with coins

According to data released on September 9 by the United States Department of Agriculture, food insecurity levels in New Hampshire continued to decline during 2019, prior to the onset of the ongoing COVID-19 crisis. The report outlines the trends of reduced food insecurity in the nation and in New Hampshire, declining from the higher levels resulting from the Great Recession of 2007 to 2009. The overall improvements to the state economy through 2019, along with the effectiveness of key nutritional aid programs, did contribute to lower levels of food insecurity, although the benefits of the economic recovery did not reach all Granite Staters in an equal or timely manner. Although food insecurity levels declined through the years preceding 2020, the current crisis facing Granite Staters is not reflected in these 2019 data. The recent economic pressures on many individuals and families with lower incomes in New Hampshire have been severe, and current levels of food insecurity are very likely to be substantially higher.