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Preliminary Analysis of the State Budget Agreement

September 26, 2019 State Budget

New Hampshire’s new State Budget boosts funding for local public education, with a substantial increase during the budget biennium and a smaller increase continued over time, and includes upward adjustments to Medicaid reimbursement rates, one-time aid to cities and towns, and support for affordable housing. The budget funds these initiatives in part by deploying current surplus revenues, including revenues from reduced spending and increased lapse during the continuing resolution. Funding stems in part from freezing business tax rates at 2019 levels. However, future business tax rates would be contingent on a revenue-based trigger and could move up or down for Tax Year 2021 depending on the strength of receipts during the first year of the budget biennium.

Read NHFPI’s preliminary analysis of the State Budget agreement, published prior to the Legislature’s vote.

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New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage Falls Further Behind

6 Jan 2020

tree with coins

The federal minimum wage is the lowest hourly wage that can be paid to most workers anywhere in the nation. Since its inception at the national level in 1938, when only certain workers were covered, the wage has increased and encompassed more types of employees over time. State law sets New Hampshire’s minimum wage to the federal minimum level, currently at $7.25 per hour. An individual working 40 hours per week at this wage will make about $15,000 per year, assuming they work all 52 weeks. This income level is below the federal poverty guidelines for all households other than a single person, and well below the levels for households that include a partner and children.