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Preliminary Analysis of the State Budget Agreement

September 26, 2019 State Budget

New Hampshire’s new State Budget boosts funding for local public education, with a substantial increase during the budget biennium and a smaller increase continued over time, and includes upward adjustments to Medicaid reimbursement rates, one-time aid to cities and towns, and support for affordable housing. The budget funds these initiatives in part by deploying current surplus revenues, including revenues from reduced spending and increased lapse during the continuing resolution. Funding stems in part from freezing business tax rates at 2019 levels. However, future business tax rates would be contingent on a revenue-based trigger and could move up or down for Tax Year 2021 depending on the strength of receipts during the first year of the budget biennium.

Read NHFPI’s preliminary analysis of the State Budget agreement, published prior to the Legislature’s vote.

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Pending Federal Proposals Would Reduce SNAP Benefits, Including Enrollment of Households with Children

25 Oct 2019

tree with coins

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known as the New Hampshire Food Stamp Program in the Granite State, helps families and individuals with lower-incomes put food on the table. Eligibility for SNAP is based on gross and net income, assets, household size, and other factors. Additionally, a large portion of SNAP eligibility is dependent on meeting certain work requirements. In September 2019, 73,671 Granite Staters were enrolled in SNAP, including 28,361 children. About one in nine children in New Hampshire receive SNAP benefits, based on these most recent data. Enrolled older adults and individuals with disabilities also rely on SNAP for food assistance.