Home » Currently Reading:

Poverty in New Hampshire: 2014 Poll

In 2014, the Investing in Communities Initiative (ICI), a capacity-building initiative in New Hampshire from 2013-2016, commissioned a public and legislator opinion research project on the issue of poverty in New Hampshire. The project was conducted by a group of professional researchers and consisted of focus groups, a poll of New Hampshire residents, and a focused survey of members of the New Hampshire legislature.

In a session with the pollsters in January 2015, ICI shared in-depth findings from the research and communications guidance for talking about policies to reduce poverty with a group of 40 advocacy leaders. ICI staff also shared the findings of the survey with advocates and legislators at the “Walk a Day in My Shoes” poverty simulation conducted in May 2015 and in less formal settings of advocates, including meetings of the NH CARES coalition.

Poll Results Press Release & Slides

Learn more about the project and key findings in this February 2015 interview with New Hampshire Public Radio.

For additional information about this research, contact staff at the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute.

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

Elections Highlight Continuing Questions About Keno Revenue

8 Nov 2017

tree with coins

While results are still preliminary, Keno gaming appears to have been legalized in seven cities around New Hampshire as a result of Tuesday’s votes. The margin of victory in Rochester for Keno legalization was reportedly only one vote and may still be subject to change or recount, but voters appear to have legalized Keno gaming in Berlin, Claremont, Laconia, Manchester, Nashua, Rochester, and Somersworth. Voters in Concord, Dover, and Keene voted against Keno gaming legalization. Franklin had legalized Keno gaming previously, and the Portsmouth City Council decided to not put Keno on the ballot. Other municipalities, including the City of Lebanon, may make decisions regarding Keno legalization next year. These results have implications for State policy and finances.