Revenue in Review: An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System and Major Revenue Sources

New Hampshire’s revenue system is relatively unique in the United States, as it lacks broad-based income and sales taxes and instead relies on a diversity of more narrowly-based taxes, fees, and other revenue sources to fund public services. This system presents both advantages and disadvantages to stable, adequate, and sustainable revenue generation.

Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends

Building the New Hampshire State Budget is a long process, which includes five major phases, challenging jargon, unwritten norms, multiple revenue estimates, and several different versions of expenditure plans and revenue expectations. But understanding the State Budget is more than just learning the process; it is key to understanding our priorities and values as a State.

Making Ends Meet

New Hampshire’s economy has, for the most part, recovered from the Great Recession, yet far too many working families still struggle to make ends meet.

Data Viz

These posts feature interactive data and insights to improve public understanding of fiscal and economic trends important to New Hampshire.  

Recent Publications:

The Conference Committee’s FY 2016-2017 Budget

June 23, 2015 State Budget
New Hampshire State House

In its particulars, the version of the FY 2016-2017 budget approved by the House and Senate conference committee on June 18 bears a strong resemblance to the tax and spending plan adopted by the upper chamber just a few weeks ago. While the conference agreement is intended to finance the operations of state government over the next two fiscal years, it is perhaps more notable for what it will do in the years after the close of the FY 2016-2017 biennium. The agreement includes a set of business tax cuts that, though they will reduce revenue by more than $20 million in the upcoming biennium, will not take full effect until FY 2020; once they do, they will drain more than $100 million out of each biennial budget.

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The Senate Finance Committee’s Proposed FY 2016-2017 Budget

June 2, 2015 State Budget
Senate Chamber

Buoyed by a more optimistic outlook for revenue collections over the next two years, the version of the FY 2016-2017 budget approved by the Senate Finance Committee would mitigate some of the spending reductions adopted by the House of Representatives and would reverse others completely. Nevertheless, the Committee’s version of the budget lacks permanent changes in policy necessary to address the failure of the state’s revenue system to recover from the national recession. Consequently, the Committee’s budget proposal falls short of the plan offered by Governor Hassan, both in terms of investments critical to New Hampshire’s economic future and the amount of resources allocated to services designed to protect the most vulnerable Granite Staters.

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April Revenue Collections Welcome News for FY 2016-2017 Budget Deliberations

May 6, 2015 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

In putting together New Hampshire’s budget every two years, policymakers pass a number of important milestones, such as the submission of the Governor’s initial spending plan in February and public hearings in both the House and the Senate in the spring. Among the most critical of these milestones is the announcement of revenue collections for the month of April. The April numbers are important as they provide greater insight into likely revenue totals for the current fiscal year and, by extension, what the state might reasonably expect to take in during the coming biennium.

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Common Cents Blog

Legislature Passes Budget, Now Heading to the Governor

22 Jun 2017

tree with coins

On June 22, both the New Hampshire House and the Senate passed HB 144, the primary budget bill, and HB 517, the budget trailer bill, as proposed by the Committee of Conference. These two bills allocate and direct funding for the next two State fiscal years (SFY), which begin on July 1, 2017 and end June 30, 2019. HB 144 authorizes and appropriates $11.855 billion for SFYs 2018-2019 for State agencies to use, although the Legislature assumes State agencies will lapse a certain percentage of their appropriations and spend less money overall. This lapse, however, is not included in the amount agencies are legally appropriated in HB 144.

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