Revenue in Review: An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System and Major Revenue Sources

New Hampshire’s revenue system is relatively unique in the United States, as it lacks broad-based income and sales taxes and instead relies on a diversity of more narrowly-based taxes, fees, and other revenue sources to fund public services. This system presents both advantages and disadvantages to stable, adequate, and sustainable revenue generation.

Building the Budget: New Hampshire’s State Budget Process and Recent Funding Trends

Building the New Hampshire State Budget is a long process, which includes five major phases, challenging jargon, unwritten norms, multiple revenue estimates, and several different versions of expenditure plans and revenue expectations. But understanding the State Budget is more than just learning the process; it is key to understanding our priorities and values as a State.

Making Ends Meet

New Hampshire’s economy has, for the most part, recovered from the Great Recession, yet far too many working families still struggle to make ends meet.

Data Viz

These posts feature interactive data and insights to improve public understanding of fiscal and economic trends important to New Hampshire.  

Recent Publications:

The New Hampshire Health Protection Program: Affordable Health Care Coverage for Over 44,000 Granite Staters

December 10, 2015 Health Policy
stethoscope and pen with medical charts

Over the past 18 months, more than 44,000 Granite Staters have enrolled in the New Hampshire Health Protection Program, improving their health and financial security and bringing hundreds of millions of dollars in federal funds into the state economy. Despite these advances, in the absence of legislative action, the Health Protection Program will expire at the end of 2016. If the Health Protection Program were to end, thousands of hardworking Granite Staters would lose the ability to see their doctor and the security of knowing they can get care when they need it. This Fact Sheet provides a brief description of the eligibility requirements for the program and background data on the people it serves.

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New Hampshire’s Economy: Moving Forward, but Not Yet Running on All Cylinders

October 26, 2015 State Economy

One of the key issues debated throughout this year’s extended legislative session was the state of the New Hampshire economy and whether changes in business tax rates would help to foster future growth. While this issue dominated budget discussions, an examination of the true state of the economy often seemed missing. As this Issue Brief explains, on one hand, New Hampshire businesses are steadily producing more goods and services and hiring additional workers. At the same time, though, more and more of our fellow residents struggle to provide the basics for themselves, particularly households with children.

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New Hampshire’s Revenue Problem Persists; Business Tax Rate Reductions Would Impede Full Recovery

July 27, 2015 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

New Hampshire’s ongoing budget debate hinges, in part, on current and future revenues, yet collections continue to fall short of pre-recession levels and appear unlikely to recover fully in the immediate future. Preliminary data from the Department of Administrative Services suggest that, while General and Education Fund revenue is poised to exceed initial expectations for fiscal year 2015, it will likely remain some $250 million less in FY 2015 than it was in FY 2008, after taking inflation into account. Furthermore, proposed reductions in the rates of the business profits and business enterprise taxes would help to perpetuate this revenue problem.

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Common Cents Blog

Legislature Passes Budget, Now Heading to the Governor

22 Jun 2017

tree with coins

On June 22, both the New Hampshire House and the Senate passed HB 144, the primary budget bill, and HB 517, the budget trailer bill, as proposed by the Committee of Conference. These two bills allocate and direct funding for the next two State fiscal years (SFY), which begin on July 1, 2017 and end June 30, 2019. HB 144 authorizes and appropriates $11.855 billion for SFYs 2018-2019 for State agencies to use, although the Legislature assumes State agencies will lapse a certain percentage of their appropriations and spend less money overall. This lapse, however, is not included in the amount agencies are legally appropriated in HB 144.

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