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NHFPI 2014 Conference

 

NHFPI’s first annual policy conference, “Government in the Granite State: Past, Present and Future,” examined the role New Hampshire government has played – and may play in the years ahead – in fostering economic security, promoting health, supporting education, and addressing other critical public priorities.

View video highlights:

 

 

The following lists 2014 conference sessions and participating speakers with links to presentations:

 

Promoting Health and Well-Being

Tricia Brooks, Senior Fellow, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute

Lisa Kaplan Howe, Policy Director, NH Voices for Health

Jeanne Ryer, Director, NH Citizens Health Initiative

 

Preparing New Hampshire’s Next Generation

Tom Harnisch, Assistant Director of State Relations & Policy Analysis, American Association of State Colleges & Universities

Mark Joyce, Executive Director, NH School Administrators Association

Tom Raffio, President & CEO, Northeast Delta Dental

Links to Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University videos:

 

Ensuring Economic Security for Families and Individuals

Ben Frost, Director of Public Affairs, NH Housing

Bob Mack, President, NH Local Welfare Administrators Association

Beth Mattingly, Director of Research on Vulnerable Families, The Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire

 

Fostering Sustained and Shared Economic Growth

Doug Hall, Director, Economic Analysis & Research Network

Rebecca Harris, Director, Transport NH

Judy Silva, Executive Director, NH Municipal Association

 

Keynote Address

Michael Leachman, Director of State Fiscal Research, Center on Budget & Policy Priorities

 

 

Download the 2014 Conference Program

 

 

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

Interactive Maps of Municipal Economic Disparities and Fiscal Capacities

30 Aug 2018

tree with coins

New Hampshire’s economy continues to grow overall, but significant disparities in economic conditions and service needs exist within the boundaries of the Granite State. Differences between the southeastern part of the state and the more rural northern and western regions can be identified broadly and are present across many different indicators. However, experiences in local communities can vary widely even within regions. NHFPI’s new Issue Brief, Measuring New Hampshire’s Municipalities: Economic Disparities and Fiscal Capacities, explores measures indicating the differing experiences of these communities. Interactive maps showing many of these measures are available through NHFPI’s Data Viz posts.