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NHFPI 2014 Conference

 

NHFPI’s first annual policy conference, “Government in the Granite State: Past, Present and Future,” examined the role New Hampshire government has played – and may play in the years ahead – in fostering economic security, promoting health, supporting education, and addressing other critical public priorities.

View video highlights:

 

 

The following lists 2014 conference sessions and participating speakers with links to presentations:

 

Promoting Health and Well-Being

Tricia Brooks, Senior Fellow, Georgetown University Health Policy Institute

Lisa Kaplan Howe, Policy Director, NH Voices for Health

Jeanne Ryer, Director, NH Citizens Health Initiative

 

Preparing New Hampshire’s Next Generation

Tom Harnisch, Assistant Director of State Relations & Policy Analysis, American Association of State Colleges & Universities

Mark Joyce, Executive Director, NH School Administrators Association

Tom Raffio, President & CEO, Northeast Delta Dental

Links to Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University videos:

 

Ensuring Economic Security for Families and Individuals

Ben Frost, Director of Public Affairs, NH Housing

Bob Mack, President, NH Local Welfare Administrators Association

Beth Mattingly, Director of Research on Vulnerable Families, The Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire

 

Fostering Sustained and Shared Economic Growth

Doug Hall, Director, Economic Analysis & Research Network

Rebecca Harris, Director, Transport NH

Judy Silva, Executive Director, NH Municipal Association

 

Keynote Address

Michael Leachman, Director of State Fiscal Research, Center on Budget & Policy Priorities

 

 

Download the 2014 Conference Program

 

 

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

tree with coins

It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.