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New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute Board of Directors Appoints AnnMarie French Interim Executive Director

December 6, 2017 News

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 6, 2017

 

New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute Board of Directors Appoints
AnnMarie French Interim Executive Director

 

Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute Board of Directors has appointed AnnMarie French to serve as interim executive director of the organization, effective Monday, December 4, 2017.

AnnMarie assumes the role of interim executive director following the departure of John Shea, who resigned from the role of executive director on December 1.

“The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute’s Board is so appreciative of AnnMarie’s commitment and dedication to the organization over the years,” said Mil Duncan, chair of the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute Board of Directors. “AnnMarie’s ability to think strategically about the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute’s role, her history with our work and our partners, and her contacts across the state make her the ideal person to lead the organization as we move through this transition.“

AnnMarie has served as the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute’s communications manager since joining the organization in January 2014. As interim executive director, AnnMarie will oversee the organization’s operations, communications, and public policy research.

The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute Board of Directors will initiate a search for a new executive director in early 2018.

The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute is an independent non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to exploring, developing, and promoting public policies that foster economic opportunity and prosperity for all New Hampshire residents, with an emphasis on low- and moderate-income families and individuals. Learn more at www.nhfpi.org.

 

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