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Policy Conference 2015

Building a Better Budget:

Meeting Today’s Needs, Preparing for Tomorrow

 

 

NHFPI Budget and Policy Conference logo

On Friday, January 23, 2015, the New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute convened Building a Better Budget: Meeting Today’s Needs, Preparing for Tomorrow to provide a forum for dialogue around how to build a budget that allows the Granite State to create, maintain, and restore the public structures that are vital to a vibrant economy.

“New Hampshire’s budget is a statement of priorities, a reflection of the values that we hold as a state, as a society, as a people,” said NHFPI Executive Director Jeff McLynch. “It is time to begin a thoughtful dialogue around how the state sets priorities and how we can ensure that New Hampshire is a place where everyone has access to opportunities to thrive and prosper.”

The event opened with a panel discussion which examined several key elements of New Hampshire’s state budget, with an emphasis on current and long-term needs pertaining to transportation, higher education, mental health, and income support programs. Panelists included Christopher Clement, former commissioner, New Hampshire Department of Transportation; Amy Messer, legal director, Disability Rights Center; Kristyn Van Ostern, associate vice chancellor and chief financial officer, Community College System of New Hampshire; and Ife Floyd, policy analyst, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

A second panel of national tax policy experts examined New Hampshire’s revenue system and offered insights into how other states approach taxation and practices that would make the Granite State’s revenue system more sound and more fair. Panelists included Norton Francis, senior research associate, Urban Institute; Carl Davis, senior policy analyst, Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy; and Dan Bucks, former director for the Montana Department of Revenue.

Conference participants, which included New Hampshire legislators, nonprofit and community leaders, and concerned citizens, were provided with an opportunity to engage in dialogue around how New Hampshire could build a budget that better meets the needs of low- and moderate-income families and individuals struggling to get by.

The event concluded with a keynote address by Anna Chu, director of the Middle-Out Economics project at the Center for American Progress, who illustrated how a strong and stable middle class is the key driver of economic growth and outlined strategies to help New Hampshire support its middle-class and increase economic opportunities for all Granite Staters.

NHFPI’s second annual policy conference, Building a Better Budget was made possible with the support of lead event sponsor the National Education Association-NH (NEA-NH) and the following partner organizations: Child and Family Services, American Federation of Teachers-NH (AFT-NH), New Futures, Full Circle Consulting, Louis Karno and Company, and Kieschnick Consulting Services.

 

Video:

Dan Bucks – Corporate Tax Havens (2 min.)

Dan Bucks – Full Presentation (24 min.)

 

Panel Presentation Slides:

Chris Clement – The Roads to New Hampshire’s Future

Amy Messer – 2014 Community Mental Health Agreement – Budget Implications

Ife Floyd – TANF in New Hampshire

Dan Bucks – Creating an Equitable and Sustainable Fiscal System

Norton Francis – Taxing Investment Income in the States

Carl Davis – New Hampshire’s Tax System and Options for Low-Income Relief

Panel Presenters – Biographies

 

Keynote Address Slides:

Anna Chu – Inequality and the Middle Class

 

Press Release:

 

Sponsors:

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Partners:

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NHFPI’s first annual policy conference, “Government in the Granite State: Past, Present and Future,” was held in January 2014 and examined the role New Hampshire government has played – and may play in the years ahead – in fostering economic security, promoting health, supporting education, and addressing other critical public priorities. Visit our 2014 conference page to view the event video and speaker presentations.

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

Elections Highlight Continuing Questions About Keno Revenue

8 Nov 2017

tree with coins

While results are still preliminary, Keno gaming appears to have been legalized in seven cities around New Hampshire as a result of Tuesday’s votes. The margin of victory in Rochester for Keno legalization was reportedly only one vote and may still be subject to change or recount, but voters appear to have legalized Keno gaming in Berlin, Claremont, Laconia, Manchester, Nashua, Rochester, and Somersworth. Voters in Concord, Dover, and Keene voted against Keno gaming legalization. Franklin had legalized Keno gaming previously, and the Portsmouth City Council decided to not put Keno on the ballot. Other municipalities, including the City of Lebanon, may make decisions regarding Keno legalization next year. These results have implications for State policy and finances.