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The Potential Impacts of Proposed SNAP Eligibility and Work Requirement Changes on Food Insecurity

October 9, 2019 Health Policy
vegetables

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program enhances the ability of individuals and families with low incomes to purchase healthy and nutritious food. This federal program benefits nearly 40 million people nationwide. Over two-thirds of participants are families with low incomes. The remaining beneficiaries include individuals with low incomes, those with temporary or permanent disabilities, and older adults on fixed-incomes. About one in eight children across New Hampshire benefit from SNAP, and 73,959 individuals were enrolled as of August 2019. Proposed changes to the eligibility criteria are projected to result in an estimated 3,500 New Hampshire households losing benefits, including up to 18 percent of all New Hampshire SNAP-enrolled households with children.

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County Medicaid Funding Obligations for Long-Term Care

August 1, 2019 Health Policy
stethoscope and pen with medical charts

Nursing home care and long-term supports and services in New Hampshire are paid by public or private funds, with Medicaid as the major public health coverage program paying for these services. Medicaid costs are paid in part by the federal government, but county governments pay a significant portion of the non-federal costs for this care, increasing upward pressure on county property tax rates. The state’s aging population will likely increase the need for long-term care services and may require modifying the current system, particularly in counties with lower taxable property values or a greater proportion of low-income residents.

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Medicaid Work Requirements and Coverage Losses

May 20, 2019 Health Policy
stethoscope and pen with medical charts

New Hampshire’s expanded Medicaid program provides health coverage to approximately 50,000 Granite Staters with low incomes. The program is a partnership between the state and federal government that brings hundreds of millions of dollars in federal revenue into the state economy annually, and is key for access to health services for people with substance use disorders or mental health conditions. In the most recent reauthorization of the expanded Medicaid program, it was reformed into the New Hampshire Granite Advantage Health Care Program, and work and community engagement requirements were added for enrollees.

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New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage Falls Further Behind

6 Jan 2020

tree with coins

The federal minimum wage is the lowest hourly wage that can be paid to most workers anywhere in the nation. Since its inception at the national level in 1938, when only certain workers were covered, the wage has increased and encompassed more types of employees over time. State law sets New Hampshire’s minimum wage to the federal minimum level, currently at $7.25 per hour. An individual working 40 hours per week at this wage will make about $15,000 per year, assuming they work all 52 weeks. This income level is below the federal poverty guidelines for all households other than a single person, and well below the levels for households that include a partner and children.