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What Families Need to Get By

July 10, 2013 Common Cents

worried familyEver wonder if it would be cheaper to move somewhere else? The Economic Policy Institute has come up with a family budget calculator that takes into account the cost of living in 615 different areas of the United States.

Select from the different urban and rural areas of the country and enter your family size to get an estimate of what the basics will cost in that community for housing, food, child care, transportation and other basic needs.

Among other things, the calculator shows the weaknesses of most poverty thresholds which come nowhere near the level that would allow a family to attain a secure yet modest living. In addition, the nationally-set thresholds fail to account for the regional variations in the cost of living.

No matter where you live, however, the study found the official poverty thresholds were inadequate in every region and for every family size studied. For a two-parent, two-child family, for example, a family was no longer poor in 2012 if they earned more than $23,283.

“Our family budget calculations show that the real costs for families to live modest, not even middle class, lives are much higher than conventional estimates show, and for families living on minimum-wage jobs, it is virtually impossible to make ends meet,” said Elise Gould, EPI’s director of health policy research and one of the authors of the EPI report “What Families Need to Get By.”

Take a look at the family budget calculator for yourself.

<http://www.epi.org/resources/budget/>

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House Fails to Pass State Budget, Process Moves to Senate

6 Apr 2017

tree with coins

The New Hampshire House, for the first time in recent history, has opted to not pass the State Budget bills, introduced as House Bill 1 and House Bill 2. April 6 was the deadline set by legislative leadership to pass those bills out of the House and move them to the Senate, a day often referred to as “crossover.” The Senate phase of the budget begins after April 6, and the Senate has expressed an intent to move forward with a budget in the Senate Finance Committee. However, with no House Bill 1 or House Bill 2 crossing over, the Senate has to forge an alternative path to debate and amend the budget.