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Purchasing Power of Minimum Wage in Manchester 15th Lowest in U.S.

It isn’t often that Manchester is thought of alongside the sunny beaches of Waikiki.

Manchester NHYet, a new analysis conducted by Governing Magazine finds that the Queen City, like Honolulu, has among the lowest minimum wages of any city in the country when it comes to real purchasing power. Based on an index developed by the Council for Community and Economic Research to compare the cost of living among urban centers, Governing calculates that the $7.25 per hour that minimum wage workers earn in Manchester would allow them to purchase just $6.01 worth of goods and services relative to other cities. In other words, the minimum wage doesn’t put nearly as many groceries in the cabinet or shirts in the drawer in Manchester as it does in other cities.

In fact, Governing performed this calculation for 308 other metropolitan areas across the country and found that Manchester’s cost-adjusted minimum was the 15th lowest in the United States. The only communities to fare worse were in Hawaii (Honolulu, Hilo), New York (Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens), California (Orange County, Oakland), Alaska (Fairbanks, Kodiak, Juneau), or along the I-95 corridor (Boston, Philadelphia, DC and its Maryland suburbs).

As Governing suggests, many of these localities – as well as the states in which they are located – are taking steps to address these disparities and raising their own minimum wages in the face of Congressional inaction.

Within New England, Connecticut lawmakers just this week adopted a minimum wage of $10.10 per hour, while Massachusetts legislators continue to weigh proposals that would bring the Bay State’s minimum to $10.50 per hour or higher.

Here in New Hampshire, the Senate will soon consider a measure to bring New Hampshire’s minimum to $9.00 per hour by 2016. An increase in New Hampshire’s minimum wage will benefit 76,000 workers living in Manchester and other communities across the state.

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Committee of Conference Keeps Medicaid Reimbursement Rate Increases, Boosts Fiscal Disparity Aid in Final Budget Agreement

24 Jun 2019

tree with coins

Negotiators from the House and Senate agreed to a final budget proposal in the Committee of Conference for House Bill 1 and House Bill 2 last week, preserving many Senate proposals while incorporating additional education aid and removing the paid family and medical leave proposal supported by both the House and the Senate in their respective versions of the State Budget. The Committee of Conference budget proposal does not include the expansion of the Interest and Dividends Tax to include capital gains as proposed by the House, but freezes business tax rates at 2018 levels. The proposal retains the Senate’s $17.5 million appropriation for a new secure psychiatric facility and $40 million in revenue sharing to municipal governments during the biennium.