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Poverty on the Rise in NH

September 19, 2013 Common Cents

Poverty on the Rise in New HampshireData released earlier today by the U.S. Census Bureau indicate that New Hampshire’s poverty rate – both for all state residents and for children – reached its highest level in six years in 2012.

According to the American Community Survey – which the Census Bureau now recommends using to understand economic trends at the state and sub-state level – New Hampshire’s overall poverty rate was 10 percent in 2012, up from 8.8 percent in 2011 and higher than the 7.1 percent rate that obtained in 2007, prior to the Great Recession.  All told, roughly 128,500 New Hampshire residents had incomes below the poverty line in 2012.

Of that total, approximately 40,500 were children under the age of 18 living with their families. In other words, 15.1 percent of all such children lived in poverty in 2012.  This rate, too, is up from its 2011 level of 11.7 percent and remains above its 2007 level of 8.3 percent.

Household Incomes Show No ImprovementThe latest Census data also suggest that the real purchasing power of the income for the typical New Hampshire household has shown no improvement over the course of the economic recovery.  In 2012, New Hampshire’s median household income was $63,280, which after adjusting for inflation and taking statistical significance into account was no different than what it was in 2011.  However, it is almost $6,000 less than the income of the median New Hampshire household in 2007; that year, after adjusting for inflation, it was close to $69,100.

To be sure, New Hampshire continues to fare better than most states by these measures. Its poverty rate remains among the lowest in the nation, while the income for the typical household here is among the highest.  Nevertheless, if New Hampshire is to reverse these trends, it will require renewed attention by state policymakers to the circumstances working Granite Staters face each day.

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House Fails to Pass State Budget, Process Moves to Senate

6 Apr 2017

tree with coins

The New Hampshire House, for the first time in recent history, has opted to not pass the State Budget bills, introduced as House Bill 1 and House Bill 2. April 6 was the deadline set by legislative leadership to pass those bills out of the House and move them to the Senate, a day often referred to as “crossover.” The Senate phase of the budget begins after April 6, and the Senate has expressed an intent to move forward with a budget in the Senate Finance Committee. However, with no House Bill 1 or House Bill 2 crossing over, the Senate has to forge an alternative path to debate and amend the budget.