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Medicaid Expansion By the Numbers

September 26, 2013 Common Cents

Medex By NumbersNew Hampshire can extend Medicaid coverage to adults ages 19 through 64 with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty line under the Affordable Care Act.  Critically, the federal government will pay the lion’s share of the costs.

Here are four key numbers to remember when considering what is at stake for New Hampshire in the Medicaid Expansion decision:

49,000:  The number of eligible uninsured people who will sign up for Medicaid.  Many of them are working in industries that don’t typically offer health insurance.

$2.4 billion:  The amount of federal aid that will flow into the New Hampshire economy if the state moves forward with the expansion.  The federal government will pay 100 percent of the costs for expanded coverage from 2014 through 2016 and no less than 90 percent thereafter.

$45 million:  The amount of state budget savings New Hampshire can realize by moving forward with the Medicaid expansion, freeing state dollars to be put to other critical uses.

5,100:  The gross number of jobs that will be created as a result of the influx of federal funds coming into the state.  Most of the jobs created will be in the health care sector, but job growth is also likely to occur in the retail, construction, and support services industries.

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House Fails to Pass State Budget, Process Moves to Senate

6 Apr 2017

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The New Hampshire House, for the first time in recent history, has opted to not pass the State Budget bills, introduced as House Bill 1 and House Bill 2. April 6 was the deadline set by legislative leadership to pass those bills out of the House and move them to the Senate, a day often referred to as “crossover.” The Senate phase of the budget begins after April 6, and the Senate has expressed an intent to move forward with a budget in the Senate Finance Committee. However, with no House Bill 1 or House Bill 2 crossing over, the Senate has to forge an alternative path to debate and amend the budget.