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Medicaid Expansion By the Numbers

September 26, 2013 Common Cents

Medex By NumbersNew Hampshire can extend Medicaid coverage to adults ages 19 through 64 with incomes up to 138 percent of the federal poverty line under the Affordable Care Act.  Critically, the federal government will pay the lion’s share of the costs.

Here are four key numbers to remember when considering what is at stake for New Hampshire in the Medicaid Expansion decision:

49,000:  The number of eligible uninsured people who will sign up for Medicaid.  Many of them are working in industries that don’t typically offer health insurance.

$2.4 billion:  The amount of federal aid that will flow into the New Hampshire economy if the state moves forward with the expansion.  The federal government will pay 100 percent of the costs for expanded coverage from 2014 through 2016 and no less than 90 percent thereafter.

$45 million:  The amount of state budget savings New Hampshire can realize by moving forward with the Medicaid expansion, freeing state dollars to be put to other critical uses.

5,100:  The gross number of jobs that will be created as a result of the influx of federal funds coming into the state.  Most of the jobs created will be in the health care sector, but job growth is also likely to occur in the retail, construction, and support services industries.

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Elections Highlight Continuing Questions About Keno Revenue

8 Nov 2017

tree with coins

While results are still preliminary, Keno gaming appears to have been legalized in seven cities around New Hampshire as a result of Tuesday’s votes. The margin of victory in Rochester for Keno legalization was reportedly only one vote and may still be subject to change or recount, but voters appear to have legalized Keno gaming in Berlin, Claremont, Laconia, Manchester, Nashua, Rochester, and Somersworth. Voters in Concord, Dover, and Keene voted against Keno gaming legalization. Franklin had legalized Keno gaming previously, and the Portsmouth City Council decided to not put Keno on the ballot. Other municipalities, including the City of Lebanon, may make decisions regarding Keno legalization next year. These results have implications for State policy and finances.