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Federal Cuts to Food Assistance Will Hurt NH Families

August 2, 2013 Common Cents

SNAP-Cuts-graphicMillions of struggling families – including one in six children in New Hampshire – face cuts to federal food assistance just in time for Thanksgiving this year.

Reductions in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), commonly known as food stamps, will hit 117,000 recipients in New Hampshire along with 47 million Americans nationwide after Oct. 31. Twenty-two million of those who rely on federal food assistance in this country are children.

The benefits, which had been expanded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) due to the poor economy, are about to expire despite the lack of economic progress for low-income families in the wake of the recession.

For a family of three, the cuts translate to $29 less per month for food – or $319 over the remaining 11 months of the fiscal year, according to new data released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and included in a report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. This leaves families — many of whom are working part-time or in low-wage jobs — with an average of less than $1.40 per person per meal.

In addition to helping to feed hungry families, SNAP is one of the fastest, most effective ways to stimulate a struggling economy.  Every $1 increase in SNAP benefits generates about $1.70 in economic activity, according to the Center.

The across-the-board cuts scheduled for November will reduce the program by $5 billion in fiscal year 2014 alone.

For more information, check out the full report at http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3899.

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The Budget Trailer Bill Hits The Road

22 Feb 2017

tree with coins

On February 21, the Office of Legislative Budget Assistant published the public version of House Bill 2, also called the “Trailer Bill.” In this proposed legislation, Governor Sununu outlined the policy changes that enable some of the proposed modifications to State government indicated in the primary budget document, House Bill 1, released on February 9 to coincide with the Governor’s budget address. House Bill 2 will now be scrutinized by the Legislature and move through the process alongside House Bill 1, which allocates the funding to specific line items.