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Building a Better Budget Conference Will Provide a Forum for Dialogue around State Budget Priorities

January 9, 2015 Common Cents

NHFPI Budget and Policy Conference logoNew Hampshire faces significant fiscal challenges as it enters the 2016-2017 budget debates and policymakers will need to take a balanced approach in providing funding for services on which residents, visitors, and businesses rely.

The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute will host Building a Better Budget: Meeting Today’s Needs, Preparing for Tomorrow on Friday, January 23 to provide a forum for dialogue around how to build a budget that allows the state to create, maintain, and restore the public structures that are vital to a vibrant economy.

Two panel discussions will examine the state budget and the revenue system that supports critical public priorities:

Pressing Priorities, Challenging Choices: Building the State Budget with a Long Term View
Over the next several months, numerous challenges will confront New Hampshire’s policymakers as they aim to create, maintain, and restore the public structures vital to a vibrant society and economy. Panelists will examine several key elements of New Hampshire’s budget, discuss how they may affect or be affected by upcoming debates, and offer their visions for building a budget that meets today’s needs and prepares for New Hampshire’s future.

  • Christopher Clement, former Commissioner, New Hampshire Department of Transportation
  • Ife Floyd, Policy Analyst, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
  • Amy Messer, Legal Director, NH-Disability Rights Center
  • Kristyn Van Ostern, Associate Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Learning from the Past, Looking to the Future: Steps toward a More Equitable and Sustainable Revenue System
New Hampshire suffers from a mismatch between the cost of vital public services and the means elected officials have selected for meeting them. State revenues have grown more slowly than the overall economy over the last two decades, leaving policymakers scrambling to keep up and creating an atmosphere of near constant crisis. Panelists will examine other states’ tax systems as well as incremental options for moving New Hampshire toward a more equitable and sustainable system for funding the services on which residents, visitors, and businesses rely.

  • Dan Bucks, former Director, Montana Department of Revenue
  • Norton Francis, Senior Research Associate, Urban Institute
  • Meg Wiehe, State Tax Policy Director, Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy

The luncheon keynote address will be presented by Anna Chu, director of the Middle-Out Economics project at the Center for American Progress. Ms. Chu will illustrate how a strong and stable middle class is the key driver of economic growth and outline strategies to help New Hampshire support its middle-class and increase economic opportunities for all Granite Staters.

Building a Better Budget will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord, NH. The event registration fee is $45. Pre-registration is required via the NHFPI website; online registration will close on January 14.

Join Granite State policymakers, nonprofit and community leaders, academic and policy experts, and concerned citizens as we explore current needs, future goals, and strategies to build a state budget that moves New Hampshire forward.

Learn more and register.

 

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House Fails to Pass State Budget, Process Moves to Senate

6 Apr 2017

tree with coins

The New Hampshire House, for the first time in recent history, has opted to not pass the State Budget bills, introduced as House Bill 1 and House Bill 2. April 6 was the deadline set by legislative leadership to pass those bills out of the House and move them to the Senate, a day often referred to as “crossover.” The Senate phase of the budget begins after April 6, and the Senate has expressed an intent to move forward with a budget in the Senate Finance Committee. However, with no House Bill 1 or House Bill 2 crossing over, the Senate has to forge an alternative path to debate and amend the budget.