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Budget Amendments Hit Uncompensated Care

A series of amendments expected tomorrow from Republican members of the House would take a large chunk out of uncompensated care payments to hospitals. If approved, they would reduce by 29 percent the $164 million the House budget would otherwise devote to uncompensated care.

NHFPI has compiled a summary of the amendments to be considered tomorrow.  Out of 17 proposed amendments, four would divert significant sums away from uncompensated care to offset changes elsewhere in the budget.  Those amendments would:

  • reduce, at a cost of $20 million over the biennium, the proposed cigarette tax rate from $1.98 per pack to $1.88 per pack;
  • eliminate provisions temporarily suspending three business tax cuts enacted under the previous legislature, a loss of approximately $13 million over the course of FY14-15;
  • appropriate $7.2 million for school building aid in FY15, and;
  • increase the cap on county nursing home payments by $6.95 million total over the biennium.

If each of these amendments were adopted, the affect would be to reduce the amount of uncompensated care payments by a total of $47 million over the biennium. For more about the House Finance Committee’s budget proposal as it stands without these amendments, click here.

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Lackluster September State Revenues Reduce Surplus

4 Oct 2017

tree with coins

September was the first big month for revenue collection of State fiscal year (SFY) 2018, and while the total cash collected should not yet ring alarm bells, overall receipts were nothing to boast about. This trend continues observations from SFY 2017, which ended June 30, 2017, and the first two months of the current fiscal year. The General and Education Trust Funds, the primary repositories for the least restricted revenue streams from State taxation, were $2.3 million (0.5 percent) above plan for the year after September’s receipts, but that was down from $4.6 million at the end of August, with September’s shortfall relative to the revenue plan cutting the unrestricted cash revenue surplus in half.