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Examining the Governor’s and House Budgets by State Agency

April 30, 2019 Data Viz
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Both Governor Sununu and the New Hampshire House of Representatives have produced recommended budgets for the State. To help build those budgets, State agencies made funding requests to provide services. Comparisons between the State agency requests, the Governor’s recommendation, and the budget passed by the House provide insights into the …

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House Budget Funding for the NH Department of Health and Human Services

April 30, 2019 Data Viz
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The New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) is the largest State agency, with responsibility for major program areas including child protection at the Division of Children, Youth, and Families; Medicaid, which helps about 178,000 people access health care, including children and those with disabilities; the Food Stamp …

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Examining the Governor’s Budget Proposal by Activity Unit

March 29, 2019 Data Viz
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Governor Sununu’s State Budget proposal increases funding overall, but it does not increase funding consistently across all types of public services. Comparisons are often made between the Governor’s request and both the prior State Budget and the original budget requests from State agencies. To learn more about Governor Sununu’s proposed …

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New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage Falls Further Behind

6 Jan 2020

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The federal minimum wage is the lowest hourly wage that can be paid to most workers anywhere in the nation. Since its inception at the national level in 1938, when only certain workers were covered, the wage has increased and encompassed more types of employees over time. State law sets New Hampshire’s minimum wage to the federal minimum level, currently at $7.25 per hour. An individual working 40 hours per week at this wage will make about $15,000 per year, assuming they work all 52 weeks. This income level is below the federal poverty guidelines for all households other than a single person, and well below the levels for households that include a partner and children.