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Regional Impact of Raising New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage

April 4, 2014 State Economy

Raising New Hampshire’s minimum wage would begin to build an economy that works for everyone in the Granite State, enhancing economic security for thousands of workers and helping to boost bottom lines at local businesses. While the impact of a higher minimum wage would be felt throughout New Hampshire, some regions of the state would be more affected than others, due to variations in population and in the composition of local workforces.

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Long Since Due: An Increase in New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage

March 12, 2014 State Economy
NH Minimum Wage Worker statistics

Due to legislative inaction and the corrosive effects of inflation, New Hampshire’s current minimum wage comes up short in a number of ways. It trails behind the rest of New England, stands below prior levels in terms of real purchasing power, and leaves workers struggling to get by. Accordingly, raising the minimum wage and ensuring it is adjusted for the cost of living in future years would help families make ends meet, boost sales at local businesses, and put New Hampshire on a path towards an economy that works for everyone.

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NHFPI Testifies in Support of Increase to NH Minimum Wage

February 11, 2014 Research, State Economy

The New Hampshire Fiscal Policy Institute (NHFPI) today joined New Hampshire legislators, small business owners, and a broad coalition of statewide organizations in voicing support for an increase to New Hampshire’s minimum wage, currently $7.25 an hour and the lowest in New England. NHFPI Executive Director Jeff McLynch provided testimony …

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Common Cents Blog

Flexible CARES Act Funds Mostly Allocated, Partially Unspent as Deadline Looms

4 Nov 2020

tree with coins

Nearly all the federal funding granted to the State of New Hampshire in the Spring to combat the COVID-19 crisis has been allocated to pandemic-related programs as of the beginning of November. However, significant amounts of funding have not yet been expended. The State must spend these funds by December 30 or return them to the federal government. While some of these funds may be in the process of being spent now or will be used in the next two months based on existing plans, the significant amount of funds left unspent suggests a substantial risk that money will be returned to the federal government and not be deployed to directly support Granite Staters.