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Poverty Continues to Climb in the United States, Remains Above Pre-Recession Levels in New Hampshire

September 13, 2011 Research, State Economy
Manchester NH

While New Hampshire’s poverty rate is markedly lower than that of the nation, it is still substantially higher than it was several years ago, reflecting the state’s ongoing difficulties in bouncing back from the recession.

According to preliminary Census Bureau figures, approximately 94,000 Granite Staters – or 7.2 percent of the state’s population – lived in poverty during the two-year period from 2009 to 2010. For the nation as a whole, 46.2 million people had incomes below the poverty line in 2010, resulting in a poverty rate of 15.1 percent.

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Poverty on the Rise Across the US and in New Hampshire

September 16, 2010 State Economy
Manchester NH

The US Census Bureau’s annual report on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage reveals a sizable increase in the national poverty rate in 2009 with a similarly sharp upturn in poverty in New Hampshire. A poverty rate of 7.4 percent suggests that roughly 97,000 people in New Hampshire had incomes below the official poverty line during the 2008-2009 period.

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Expanded Medicaid Proposal Moves Forward with Changes to Work Requirements

11 Apr 2018

tree with coins

On April 5, the New Hampshire House of Representatives passed an amended version of expanded Medicaid reauthorization that modifies the work requirements outlined in the State Senate’s proposal and makes a variety of other, smaller changes. The House accepted the amendment from the House Health, Human Services, and Elderly Affairs Committee and voted to move the bill to the House Finance Committee for a second review. Approximately 52,000 low-income Granite Staters rely on expanded Medicaid for access to health care, and the State Legislature must reauthorize the program for it to continue beyond the end of this year.