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New Hampshire’s Numbers: 2016 Census Bureau County Estimates Show Disparities Within the State

October 19, 2017 State Economy
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Following the primary data release in September 2017, the United States Census Bureau American Community Survey data released in October 2017 provides estimates, based on data collected in surveys conducted throughout 2016, of New Hampshire’s population characteristics for all geographic subdivisions with more than 20,000 residents. These data permit comparisons between point estimates for median household income and poverty rates in each of the state’s ten counties and 13 largest municipalities. On a county level, Granite Staters see widely different median household incomes from statewide median of $70,936, based on data collected in 2016, but also from each other.

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New Hampshire’s Numbers: 2016 Census Bureau Estimates for Income, Poverty, Housing Costs, and Health Insurance Coverage

September 28, 2017 State Economy
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The United States Census Bureau American Community Survey data released September 2017 provides estimates, based on data collected in surveys conducted throughout 2016, of New Hampshire’s population characteristics. The survey data provide year-to-year comparisons of key indicators affecting the lives of Granite Staters. This Fact Sheet outlines Census Bureau estimates for income, poverty, housing costs, and health insurance coverage data for New Hampshire.

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The New Hampshire Food Stamp Program

March 10, 2017 State Economy
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The New Hampshire Food Stamp Program, also known by the federal designation Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), provides resources to eligible individuals to purchase certain food items at grocery stores and other participating food retailers. SNAP benefits are designed to provide the difference between the cost of a nutritionally adequate food plan (designed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture) and 30 percent of the net household income, which is the portion expected to be used on food. The federal government funds 100 percent of SNAP benefits, and the cost of state-level administration is split evenly with the state government.

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Unsettled Business Tax Revenues Push Surplus Upward, Offer Limited Insight for the Future

7 Dec 2018

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The fortunes of State revenues continue to rise and fall with New Hampshire’s two primary business taxes, which provided positive signs for near-term revenue but have not shown these levels are sustainable. While the two business taxes remained healthy, other revenue sources were relatively flat overall, leaving the State with a revenue surplus entirely dependent on the two business taxes. The lack of growth in other revenue sources combined with the uncertainty around business taxes creates an environment in which it will be very difficult to accurately project revenues for the new State Budget biennium.