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New Hampshire’s Workforce, Wages, and Economic Opportunity

August 30, 2019 State Economy

The essence of a labor market is the workers in it. When an economy improves, it is often assumed that conditions for workers, including wages and job opportunities, improve as well. In the decade since the Great Recession, which officially lasted from December 2007 to June 2009, New Hampshire’s economy has seen growth in its inflation-adjusted Gross State Product, increases in the number of available jobs and in the size of the labor force, and continued decreases in the unemployment rate. On the surface, it appears that this combination of factors would lead more workers to being better off than they were before the Great Recession. However, the economic recovery has not reached all Granite Staters equally.

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County Medicaid Funding Obligations for Long-Term Care

August 1, 2019 Health Policy
stethoscope and pen with medical charts

Nursing home care and long-term supports and services in New Hampshire are paid by public or private funds, with Medicaid as the major public health coverage program paying for these services. Medicaid costs are paid in part by the federal government, but county governments pay a significant portion of the non-federal costs for this care, increasing upward pressure on county property tax rates. The state’s aging population will likely increase the need for long-term care services and may require modifying the current system, particularly in counties with lower taxable property values or a greater proportion of low-income residents.

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The Senate State Budget for State Fiscal Years 2020 and 2021

June 14, 2019 State Budget

The Senate voted to pass its version of the State Budget on June 6, modifying the version provided by the House and proposing major new initiatives in health and social services. Incorporating several bills passed independently by the Senate, the Senate Budget would expand home- and community-based services for children, establish a new job training program, and invest in a secure psychiatric unit facility and other mental health facility infrastructure. The Senate also voted to increase Medicaid reimbursement rates for all providers with a $60 million appropriation, which would help ensure the provision of health services to residents with limited resources and assist in bolstering the health care workforce.

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Increases to SNAP Benefits Would Offset Higher Food Costs and Boost the Economy

30 Jul 2020

tree with coins

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program provides critical nutritional aid to individuals and families with low incomes, including those who have faced income losses. As Granite Staters continue to navigate the COVID-19 crisis, aiding those who are most affected and who have the fewest resources will help ensure they weather the crisis while supporting the economic recovery as well. Federal policy actions so far have provided temporary emergency SNAP allotments to recipients, along with extended nutritional benefits to certain children due to school closures, temporarily easing certain redetermination criteria, among other changes. Despite these actions, additional benefits may be needed as more impacts of the COVID-19 crisis become known, and as other supports expire or are discontinued. Additional SNAP benefits would help support Granite Staters who are experiencing food insecurity while providing a boost to the economy.

NHFPI Seventh Annual Conference

NHFPI Annual Conference