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Federal Budget Plans Would Shift Medicaid Costs to New Hampshire

May 26, 2011 Health Policy
US Capitol

As many as 165,000 New Hampshire residents relied on Medicaid in fiscal year 2010. The program provides long-term care to seniors, helps residents with disabilities live independently, and enables children to see a doctor when they are sick or injured. Since 1965, the program has functioned as a partnership between the state and the federal government, guaranteeing coverage for qualified recipients and providing federal funds to cover a fixed percentage of the costs.

Yet, several federal budget proposals would fundamentally recast that partnership, converting Medicaid into a block grant program, limiting federal contributions and dropping the guarantee of coverage for those who are deemed eligible.

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Medicaid: A Key Source of Insurance in New Hampshire

April 20, 2011 Health Policy, State Budget

Medicaid serves about one in 10 people in N.H. A look at the families and individuals it serves, its funding structure and the potential consequences of significant reductions to the program.

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Testimony on HB1 and the Proposed Closure of NH Healthy Kids

March 11, 2011 Health Policy, State Budget
NH flag

On Thursday, March 10, NHFPI Policy Analyst Deborah Fournier appeared before the House Finance Committee to highlight concerns related to the Governor’s proposal to close the New Hampshire Healthy Kids Corporation and to convert its enrollees into Medicaid enrollees.

“It is unclear whether Medicaid, with no managed care contract and no additional staff, will be able to hold a lower per member per month cost constant in the absence of other utilization and care coordination controls,” Fournier said.

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Year-End and July Revenues Show Surplus, Raise Questions About Business Taxes

14 Aug 2018

tree with coins

State revenues continue to come in strong, with unaudited numbers from last year and new numbers from July both showing revenue growth. Preliminary accrual figures for State fiscal year 2018, which ended June 30, 2018, showed General and Education Trust Fund revenues were over the prior year’s figures by $168.3 million (7.0 percent). July revenues were pushed above the State Budget’s planned amount by $8.7 million (8.0 percent), including a larger surplus amount attributable to solely business tax receipts. However, several other major revenue sources were down between last year and the year before, and July’s revenues continued to show weakness in a few key areas and raise ongoing questions regarding elevated business tax receipts.