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Medicaid Expansion in NH: Health Care Coverage for Thousands; Little or No Cost to the State

July 29, 2013 Health Policy

Policymakers in New Hampshire have an opportunity to extend affordable health care coverage to low-income Granite Staters through Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). A nine-member commission, created as part of the FY 2014-2015 budget, is working through the summer and into the fall to study the consequences of expanding Medicaid. Evidence recently presented to the commission suggests that Medicaid expansion would benefit roughly 48,000 New Hampshire residents at little or no cost to the state.

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Fact Sheet: New Hampshire’s Medicaid Program

July 15, 2013 Health Policy

Medicaid is a decades-old partnership between states and the federal government that currently provides health insurance to 137,000 low-income residents in New Hampshire. However, its reach is limited. Many hard-working but low-earning Granite State adults are not eligible for the program, leaving many uninsured. This fact sheet explains the current program’s strengths and limitations as lawmakers consider whether to accept federal funds to extend Medicaid to more low income adults.

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Arkansas’ Approach to the Medicaid Expansion: Premium Assistance

May 21, 2013 Health Policy

As New Hampshire considers the opportunity to accept millions of dollars in federal funds to reduce the number of people without insurance, some policy makers are looking at an experimental approach embraced by the state of Arkansas as it seeks to extend Medicaid to more of its low-income workers.

This issue brief explains the basic framework of Arkansas’ premium assistance proposal, examines the federal standards that will have to be met in order to implement such an approach, and explores some of the issues that must be weighed.

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New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

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It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.