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Arkansas’ Approach to the Medicaid Expansion: Premium Assistance

May 21, 2013 Health Policy

As New Hampshire considers the opportunity to accept millions of dollars in federal funds to reduce the number of people without insurance, some policy makers are looking at an experimental approach embraced by the state of Arkansas as it seeks to extend Medicaid to more of its low-income workers.

This issue brief explains the basic framework of Arkansas’ premium assistance proposal, examines the federal standards that will have to be met in order to implement such an approach, and explores some of the issues that must be weighed.

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Testimony Before Senate Finance on State Budget

May 9, 2013 Health Policy, Research

I am here to express support for the provisions of the FY 2014-2015 budget that would enable New Hampshire to receive hundreds of millions of dollars in federal Medicaid funds and to reduce the number of Granite Staters who currently lack affordable health insurance coverage.

New Hampshire can extend coverage to 40 percent more people and do it with no net cost to the state, as long as managed care goes forward and the state takes advantage of offsetting savings in other areas. The even better news is that there is the potential for the state to achieve net savings if all savings targets and revenue projections hold.

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The ACA’s Medicaid Coverage Option: An Affordable Way to Insure Thousands of Granite Staters

September 26, 2012 Health Policy

New Hampshire policymakers have the option under the Affordable Care Act to extend Medicaid coverage to adults with annual incomes below $15,000 and to pass the vast majority of the costs onto the federal government. The costs to New Hampshire would be offset in part, and possibly in whole, by savings elsewhere in the budget. By electing the Medicaid coverage option, New Hampshire would be able to lower payments to hospitals for care for the uninsured and potentially reduce costs for mental health, substance abuse, or public health services. In short, New Hampshire would be able to provide health care coverage to at least an additional 36,000 residents, while spending only 2 percent more on Medicaid than it would have otherwise.

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Unsettled Business Tax Revenues Push Surplus Upward, Offer Limited Insight for the Future

7 Dec 2018

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The fortunes of State revenues continue to rise and fall with New Hampshire’s two primary business taxes, which provided positive signs for near-term revenue but have not shown these levels are sustainable. While the two business taxes remained healthy, other revenue sources were relatively flat overall, leaving the State with a revenue surplus entirely dependent on the two business taxes. The lack of growth in other revenue sources combined with the uncertainty around business taxes creates an environment in which it will be very difficult to accurately project revenues for the new State Budget biennium.