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Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Health Protection Program

November 11, 2013 Health Policy
stethoscope and pen with medical charts

On Friday, November 8, Senators Chuck Morse, Jeb Bradley, and Bob Odell introduced a bill (SS SB 1) to be considered in the remaining weeks of New Hampshire’s special legislative session. The bill would create the New Hampshire Health Protection Program and seeks to use federal funds to extend health insurance to low-income Granite Staters for the next three years. NHFPI’s latest Fact Sheet provides a brief overview of the measure.

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Fact Sheet: An Overview of the Access to Health Coverage Act

November 8, 2013 Health Policy

Introduced at the start of the legislature’s special session on November 7, the New Hampshire Access to Health Coverage Act (SS HB 1), draws heavily on the recommendations of the Commission to Study Expanded Medicaid Eligibility and seeks to craft a New Hampshire approach to extending Medicaid coverage to eligible low-income adults.

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Fact Sheet: Impact of the Medicaid Expansion by Industry

October 31, 2013 Health Policy, Research

New Hampshire policymakers have an opportunity to offer affordable health care coverage to low-income residents by expanding the state’s Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). A nine-member commission, created as part of the FY 2014-2015 budget, recently recommended that New Hampshire pursue the expansion and accept the billions of dollars in federal funds that would accompany it. Should the Legislature enact those recommendations, workers in the restaurant, construction, and lodging industries would be the principal beneficiaries, as would the companies that employ them.

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State Delays Implementation of Medicaid Work Requirements, Citing Potential Coverage Losses

11 Jul 2019

tree with coins

Earlier this week, New Hampshire state officials suspended the implementation of the work and community engagement requirements for expanded Medicaid beneficiaries until September 30. The Department of Health and Human Services had no information on the compliance of approximately 17,000 individuals, which would have meant up to that many individuals would have lost their health coverage starting in early August if they did not provide information and fulfill their required hours by the end of July. With this suspension, coverage losses due to noncompliance with the work requirements would not take place until early December, barring any other intervening policy changes from the state or federal governments or the pending results of legal action.