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Striking a Balance: Financial Contributions and Access to Care in the New Hampshire Health Protection Program

August 21, 2014 Health Policy

The State of New Hampshire recently opened coverage for the New Hampshire Health Protection Program, the state’s public health insurance program for low-income adults. Policy makers are now building the framework for the Premium Assistance Program, which will provide coverage through commercial insurance carriers in the federal Marketplace starting in 2016. Whether to require financial contributions, such as premium payments or cost sharing, from enrollees is a question that requires careful analysis.

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Access to Health Insurance in a SNAP

June 4, 2014 Health Policy
stethoscope and pen with medical charts

The New Hampshire Health Protection Program is expected not only to provide affordable health insurance to as many as 50,000 Granite Staters, but also to produce noticeable savings within the state budget. New Hampshire could use data it currently collects and verifies in administering the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to identify and to enroll eligible adults into the Health Protection Program. This strategy will maximize budgetary savings, minimize strains on state resources, and quickly provide affordable health insurance coverage to as many as 27,000 low-income adults.

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An Overview of the New Hampshire Health Protection Program

April 3, 2014 Health Policy

The New Hampshire Health Protection Program uses three approaches to extend affordable health insurance to low-income Granite Staters: the Health Insurance Premium Program; the Bridge to Marketplace Premium Assistance Program; and the Marketplace Premium Assistance Program. This summary table outlines eligibility requirements, program duration and key provisions of the New Hampshire Health Protection Program.

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New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

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It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.