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Business Taxes Sustain Surplus While Other Sources Fall Just Short

July 18, 2018 Common Cents
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The State revenue figures from June show continued strength in business taxes, but suggested that other revenue sources may be faltering, such as lottery and liquor sales revenues, or just meeting their targets. The data release for June showed the cash revenues for the last month of the State fiscal year from tax and non-tax revenue sources, as well as tallies for the entire year. Final, audited figures will not be available until December, but the cash figures suggest a substantial surplus for the fiscal year, both relative to the State revenue plan and to State fiscal year 2017.

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Job Growth Slowed in New Hampshire During 2017

June 11, 2018 Common Cents
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The rate jobs were added to the economy in New Hampshire during 2017 was considerably lower than during 2016, suggesting fewer additional jobs are being filled in the state. This slowing in job growth from the higher levels seen during 2015 and 2016 may reflect that, in a growing economy with a low unemployment rate, many employers are having difficulty finding workers to fill positions.

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May Revenues Show Rebounding Real Estate Transfer Tax

June 8, 2018 Common Cents
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State revenues were closer to expectations in May after three months of abnormal receipts, with most major sources bringing in about as much revenue as planned for May and the largest deviation coming from a rebounding Real Estate Transfer Tax. Although May is not an important month for the state’s two main business taxes, receipts from these two sources only contributed modestly to the surplus and showed a small decline from May of last year.

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New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

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It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.