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Work Requirement Implementation Begins Amid Troubling Signs from Other States

March 4, 2019 Common Cents
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Implementation of the work and community engagement requirements for Medicaid expansion enrollees officially began March 1, with June as the first month requiring non-exempt enrollees to have 100 hours of qualifying activities. The flexibility within New Hampshire’s current rules permits enrollees to use a subsequent month to fulfill their required hours, and certain individuals are exempt from the requirements; however, individuals could lose health care coverage for not fulfilling the work and community engagement reporting requirements as early as August.

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Federal Shutdown Threatens Food Assistance Benefits

January 24, 2019 Common Cents
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The continuing partial federal government shutdown has jeopardized the continuation of food assistance through the New Hampshire Food Stamp Program to more than 78,000 individuals, including 30,000 children. The shutdown has prompted a shift in the timing of benefits for February in a way that might make it difficult for some families to pay for food throughout the month, and may leave those in need without food assistance beyond February if the shutdown continues.

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Federal Tax Law Effects Still Uncertain as NH Business Tax Rates Drop

January 4, 2019 Common Cents
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New Hampshire’s two primary business tax rates dropped for most businesses starting at the beginning of this calendar year, and state business tax revenues generated by the effects of the federal tax overhaul may be limited going forward, putting the state’s largest tax revenue stream at risk.

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New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

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It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.