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March Revenues Continue to Grow Surplus

April 9, 2018 Common Cents
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March revenues were above the State’s planned amount of receipts for the month, with the two primary business taxes continuing to overperform while certain other key sources lagged. March is an important month for state revenue, as the State revenue plan anticipated 26.3 percent of General and Education Trust Fund receipts for State fiscal year (SFY) 2018 would be collected during March. The General and Education Trust Funds collected $655.5 million in March, or $13.9 million more than in the State revenue plan, in unaudited cash receipts, bringing the surplus to $53.2 million.

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Unplanned Business Tax Revenues Bolster Surplus, Prompt Questions

March 7, 2018 Common Cents
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The size of the State’s surplus continues to climb as a result of February’s revenues, with receipts from the two primary business taxes providing almost all of the boost while most other sources underperformed. The State collected $105.9 million in February, $15.5 million (17.1 percent) more than the $90.4 million projected by the State revenue plan. Business tax receipts were $19.9 million (189.5 percent) higher than plan, which anticipated only $10.5 million for the month.

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New Hampshire’s Complex Transportation Funding Challenges

January 30, 2018 Common Cents
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Investments in the operation, maintenance, and construction of transportation infrastructure in New Hampshire often draw from many different sources and funds. Decisions about financing mixes, timelines, projected interest costs, and the effects of deteriorating or enhanced transportation infrastructure at any level of government can all influence projects.

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Unsettled Business Tax Revenues Push Surplus Upward, Offer Limited Insight for the Future

7 Dec 2018

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The fortunes of State revenues continue to rise and fall with New Hampshire’s two primary business taxes, which provided positive signs for near-term revenue but have not shown these levels are sustainable. While the two business taxes remained healthy, other revenue sources were relatively flat overall, leaving the State with a revenue surplus entirely dependent on the two business taxes. The lack of growth in other revenue sources combined with the uncertainty around business taxes creates an environment in which it will be very difficult to accurately project revenues for the new State Budget biennium.