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Unplanned Business Tax Revenues Bolster Surplus, Prompt Questions

March 7, 2018 Common Cents
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The size of the State’s surplus continues to climb as a result of February’s revenues, with receipts from the two primary business taxes providing almost all of the boost while most other sources underperformed. The State collected $105.9 million in February, $15.5 million (17.1 percent) more than the $90.4 million projected by the State revenue plan. Business tax receipts were $19.9 million (189.5 percent) higher than plan, which anticipated only $10.5 million for the month.

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New Hampshire’s Complex Transportation Funding Challenges

January 30, 2018 Common Cents
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Investments in the operation, maintenance, and construction of transportation infrastructure in New Hampshire often draw from many different sources and funds. Decisions about financing mixes, timelines, projected interest costs, and the effects of deteriorating or enhanced transportation infrastructure at any level of government can all influence projects.

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Early Interest and Dividends Tax Payments Boost Surplus

January 5, 2018 Common Cents
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December revenues closed out the first half of State fiscal year 2018 with a sizable increase in the surplus, but the boost’s source suggests the result might be lower receipts in the next half of the year. Revenue sources for the General and Education Trust Funds collected $7.7 million (3.3 percent) more than planned in December, which was $14.4 million (6.4 percent) more than last December and resulted in a total unrestricted revenue surplus of $18.7 million (2.0 percent) above plan for the year. However, $7.3 million of the $7.7 million surplus from December came from a single source: the Interest and Dividends Tax.

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Interactive Maps of Municipal Economic Disparities and Fiscal Capacities

30 Aug 2018

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New Hampshire’s economy continues to grow overall, but significant disparities in economic conditions and service needs exist within the boundaries of the Granite State. Differences between the southeastern part of the state and the more rural northern and western regions can be identified broadly and are present across many different indicators. However, experiences in local communities can vary widely even within regions. NHFPI’s new Issue Brief, Measuring New Hampshire’s Municipalities: Economic Disparities and Fiscal Capacities, explores measures indicating the differing experiences of these communities. Interactive maps showing many of these measures are available through NHFPI’s Data Viz posts.