Home » Common Cents » Recent Articles:

Continued Rise of NH’s Rental Costs Increases Financial Burdens on Residents

August 9, 2019 Common Cents
tree with coins

The New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority recently released the findings of their 2019 Residential Rental Cost Survey for the state. Conducted annually in order to understand the condition of the unsubsidized rental market in the state, the latest report identifies several important ongoing trends. The overall increase of New Hampshire’s median rent and utility costs over the past decade continues into 2019, with total rental costs for residential units trending upward to the 2019 median level of $1,347 for a two-bedroom apartment. This new data suggests this rise in costs is occurring in large and small cities and towns, counties, and the state overall. In the past five years, rental costs for two-bedroom apartments in the state have increased by nearly 22 percent on average.

... Continue Reading

Federal Court Halts New Hampshire Medicaid Work Requirements

July 30, 2019 Common Cents
tree with coins

In a July 29 ruling, a federal judge halted the implementation of New Hampshire’s work and community engagement requirements for expanded Medicaid enrollees. New Hampshire’s expanded Medicaid program provides health coverage to nearly 50,000 residents with low incomes. Work requirement implementation had already been delayed by the State due to the potential for nearly 17,000 people to lose health coverage after the first month of reporting under the new requirements.

... Continue Reading

State Delays Implementation of Medicaid Work Requirements, Citing Potential Coverage Losses

July 11, 2019 Common Cents
tree with coins

Earlier this week, New Hampshire state officials suspended the implementation of the work and community engagement requirements for expanded Medicaid beneficiaries until September 30. The Department of Health and Human Services had no information on the compliance of approximately 17,000 individuals, which would have meant up to that many individuals would have lost their health coverage starting in early August if they did not provide information and fulfill their required hours by the end of July. With this suspension, coverage losses due to noncompliance with the work requirements would not take place until early December, barring any other intervening policy changes from the state or federal governments or the pending results of legal action.

... Continue Reading

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

tree with coins

It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.