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State Revenues on Target, But Concerns Linger

September 6, 2017 Common Cents
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With revenues collected for the first two months of State fiscal year 2018, certain revenue sources appear to be matching the State’s revenue plan while others, including key revenue generators, appear to be flagging. On a cash basis, revenue for the General and Education Trust Funds was $1.4 million below plan during the month of August. The Real Estate Transfer Tax, which has been robust in recent years, fell short of plan by the largest dollar amount of any other source at $1.9 million.

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Medicaid Expansion Work Requirements Hinge on Federal Approval

September 5, 2017 Common Cents
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The State Budget, signed into law on June 28, 2017, includes a provision that requires certain Medicaid enrollees to engage in work-related activities to be eligible for Medicaid. New Hampshire’s Medicaid program includes both traditional Medicaid and expanded Medicaid under the federal Affordable Care Act. The Medicaid expansion in New Hampshire is structured as the New Hampshire Health Protection Program (NHHPP). The State Budget directs New Hampshire to seek a federal waiver to require certain NHHPP participants to engage in specified work-related activities for at least 20 hours per week.

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A Snapshot of the State’s Labor Market

August 31, 2017 Common Cents
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In the long economic recovery following the Great Recession, New Hampshire’s workers have faced slower job growth than the nation as a whole, and wages for many low-income workers have not kept pace with inflation, leaving many people with less purchasing power. New Hampshire’s job growth has been more robust in the most recent years of the post-Recession economic expansion, however. The state’s economy has been fully recovered by several key metrics for some time, and the unemployment rate remains below 3.0 percent, less than the pre-Recession levels of 2006. By most measures, it is a good time to be a worker in New Hampshire, but many of the jobs generated in the wake of the Recession offer workers less in compensation than those lost during the economic contraction.

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Food Insecurity in New Hampshire Remains Higher Than Pre-Recession Levels

21 Sep 2017

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A report released earlier this month by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service shows food insecurity nationally remained at roughly the same level in 2016, 12.3 percent of all households, as in 2015. Food insecurity is higher both nationally and in New Hampshire in the last three years than ten years ago, before the Great Recession. Although progress has been made nationally relative to the next most recent three-year period, New Hampshire has seen no statistically significant change in food insecurity between the last two three-year periods measured, and food insecurity remains higher above pre-Recession levels than the nation as a whole.