Home » Common Cents » Recent Articles:

New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

November 20, 2019 Common Cents
tree with coins

It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.

... Continue Reading

Pending Federal Proposals Would Reduce SNAP Benefits, Including Enrollment of Households with Children

October 25, 2019 Common Cents
tree with coins

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), known as the New Hampshire Food Stamp Program in the Granite State, helps families and individuals with lower-incomes put food on the table. Eligibility for SNAP is based on gross and net income, assets, household size, and other factors. Additionally, a large portion of SNAP eligibility is dependent on meeting certain work requirements. In September 2019, 73,671 Granite Staters were enrolled in SNAP, including 28,361 children. About one in nine children in New Hampshire receive SNAP benefits, based on these most recent data. Enrolled older adults and individuals with disabilities also rely on SNAP for food assistance.

... Continue Reading

New Hampshire’s Food Insecurity Levels Return to Pre-Recession Levels

September 27, 2019 Common Cents
tree with coins

According to new estimates from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), New Hampshire and the nation have experienced improvements in households’ access to food. The recently released report outlines the progressing trends of reduced food insecurity, declining from higher levels experienced in the recovery period after the Great Recession. This progress shows that despite disparities faced by lower-income individuals throughout the state, both relative improvements in the economy and the effectiveness of supplemental food programs have been aiding Granite Staters in need.

... Continue Reading

Connect with NHFPI

Common Cents Blog

New Hampshire Trails in Higher Education Funding

20 Nov 2019

tree with coins

It has been over a decade since the end of the last recession. During this time, investments and funding for public higher education across the nation have seen reductions overall. States reduced expenditures in the aftermath of the recession, including decreased spending to support public higher education. Recent analyses from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Pew Charitable Trusts have compared states’ investments in public higher education over time. When compared to pre-recession levels the amount of money allocated to public higher education nationwide has decreased. Students who attend public colleges and universities in their home states face the additional cost burdens of increasing tuition and fees that may stem from these funding cuts. In New Hampshire, Granite Staters face the second highest average in-state tuition at public four-year institutions in the nation.